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  1. Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    #181
    niky:Rutan aircraft would make good, cheap recon and spotter planes, though.
    hmm...tingin ko mas ok ung predator drone for this. dunno about the cost though

  2. Join Date
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    #182
    The predator will cost much more, and will be difficult to maintain. And think about it. If we've got stupid pilots in the program, instead of crashing one plane and wasting a pilot, they can crash them again and again and again and... :lol:

    Ang pagbalik ng comeback...

  3. Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    #183
    well...you could deduct the cost of the drone from their pay :D seriously though, baka mahal nga ung maintenance. in fact i see a trend, parang increasingly sophisticated and hard to maintain ung lumalabas na mga military hardware lately. If someone somes up with an ElectroMagnetic Pulse weapon, lagot!

  4. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    29,320
    #184
    Quote Originally Posted by niky
    As regards the Rutan LongEZ. It's too light to effectively carry ordnance. We'd probably have to buy a larger platform.

    Plus, civilian aircraft don't have hardpoints for external bomb and rocket storage. They might put too much stress on the wings. With helicopters, this isn't much of a problem as the winglets don't have to support the aircraft. Rutan aircraft would make good, cheap recon and spotter planes, though.

    I did say base it around the Rutan longEZ, not use the actual longEZ kits. It simple to scale up the design and have it modified to suit local needs & requirements. This would also include external hardpoints for ordinace or extra fuel tanks.

    Example, a local version of the military longEZ can easily be 75% bigger body to house all the required electronics, internal mounted cannons, ammo, a bigger engine & larger fuel tank. Engine exhausts can also be routed to exhaust upwards to reduce noise heard at ground level when cruising. Wings would be strengthened with kevlar leading edges & locally available composites for the rest of the wing.

  5. Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    1,218
    #185
    Quote Originally Posted by ghosthunter
    I did say base it around the Rutan longEZ, not use the actual longEZ kits. It simple to scale up the design and have it modified to suit local needs & requirements. This would also include external hardpoints for ordinace or extra fuel tanks.

    Example, a local version of the military longEZ can easily be 75% bigger body to house all the required electronics, internal mounted cannons, ammo, a bigger engine & larger fuel tank. Engine exhausts can also be routed to exhaust upwards to reduce noise heard at ground level when cruising. Wings would be strengthened with kevlar leading edges & locally available composites for the rest of the wing.
    Don't you mean wing spars instead of leading edges? Leading edges are strengthened to avoid problems from heat generated by high speed.

    But since we're into Long EZ's, it has neither spars nor ribs, because the wing is made of foam and fiberglass. R/C plane modelers are very familiar with this type of construction because it offers minimal weight.

    And here lies the fundamental problem with your proposition ... because the hallmarks of Rutan's designs are weight and aerodynamics (not to mention the weird shapes). Put a lot of weight and foul up the airflow, what you'll have is a plane not designed to fly for the job it was given. Change the construction method and I doubt if you'll come up with the same craft and still retain the same performance.

    I'd go with niky on this one ... a cheap recon/patrol craft with pocket gps and cellphone (cheap nga, hehe).
    Last edited by StraightSix; October 8th, 2005 at 05:27 AM.

  6. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    #186
    also you can give the pilot a bunch of hand grenades for "bombing runs" :bwahaha:

  7. Join Date
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    #187
    heck, nagulat nga ako when someone said we were using Little Bird choppers for bombing rebels. inimagine ko tuloy na ung co-pilot ang nagbabato ng molotov bombs, ala WWI :D

  8. Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    #188
    Actually, a bigger version of the LongEZ with reinforced wing spars would work. But no to internal storage, as that would compromise the design too much. Multimission external pylons would be better.

    Oh, yung ARES pala yung mudfighter... still, too bad it's not a production model:


    This one would be good for a ground support/suppression aircraft:

    I imagine the twin-boom configuration would allow easy installation of weapons pylon hardpoints, the inline twin-props give greater maneuverability than other twin engine planes, and the twin engine configuration provides fallback in case of engine failure.

    Ang sarap mangarap.

    Ang pagbalik ng comeback...

  9. Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    #189
    Quote Originally Posted by M54 Powered
    also you can give the pilot a bunch of hand grenades for "bombing runs" :bwahaha:
    Nagtitipid din lang eh di whistle bomb na lang from Bulacan, hehe.

    OT: Don't you hate war movies when prop rockets try to immitate the real thing? Maski RPG, may smoke trail sa movies, ekis-ekis pa

  10. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    10,808
    #190
    found this in a canadaian web site, top 20 military aircraft fleet of 2003. includes all types of aircraft from trainers, transports, fighter, bombers, etc.

    "Each year, the journal Aviation Week and Space Technology publishes a compendium of aviation statistics entitled the Aerospace Source Book. Statistics in the 2003 edition show that 171 countries reported operating military aircraft. (Note that these numbers include many unsophisticated transport and general-aviation aircraft types used for utility purposes.)

    The world’s 20 largest military fleets are listed in descending order in Table 13.1. The numbers are impressive, but it should be remembered that there have been substantial reductions in the military fleets of several countries in the past few years. For example, between 1998 and 2003, the Canadian Forces’ fleet was reduced from 581 to 427 aircraft.

    Country Number of Aircraft
    1. U.S.A. 16,511
    2. China 9,372
    3. Russia 9,220
    4. Ukraine 2,687
    5. France 1,868
    6. India 1,820
    7. Japan 1,749
    8. United Kingdom 1,574
    9. North Korea 1,536
    10. Germany 1,324
    11. Italy 1,252
    12. South Korea 1,252
    13. Libya 1,091
    14. Syria 1,053
    15. Isreal 1,038
    16. Iran 931
    17. Egypt 927
    18. Pakistan 923
    19. Taiwan 891
    20. Turkey 865 "
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    1xx. Philippines ... from the Sunday Times: "WHAT does the Philippine Air Force consist of? According to information, all the PAF has are five S21 jets, 65 helicopters of various types, two C-130 Hercules cargo planes and 39 assorted aircraft, or a total of 111 air assets....Of these aircraft, many are grounded for repairs and safety reasons. None of the F-5A/B jet fighters of the PAF Fighter Wing are serviceable....Of the 38 UH1H Huey helicopters, 85 percent are operational. The T-41D Cessna trainers of the PAF Flying School have the lowest readiness rate at 48 percent....The PAF spokesman, Lt. Col. Restituto Padilla, told The Manila Times that only two of the original 18 Marchetti SF26 training aircraft are flying. The rest are grounded."

    i want to cry huhuhuhu!

Military Hardware Thread [Split]