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  1. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    #1
    Int'l survey rates RP's corruption severe

    First posted 02:47am (Mla time) Oct 19, 2005
    By Doris C. Dumlao
    Inquirer News Service

    Editor's Note: Published on page A1 of the Oct. 19, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

    NOT ONLY was the Philippines ranked among countries with severe corruption problems -- its rating in a new survey even sank lower compared to last year's.

    On a scale of one to 10 -- with 10 as the "cleanest" -- the Philippines got a score of 2.5 based on the 2005 Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) released yesterday by global corruption watchdog Transparency International (TI).

    The Philippines was thus among 70 countries -- comprising nearly half of those included in the TI index -- that scored less than 3 on the latest CPI, indicating a "severe" corruption problem.

    The country ranked 117th, a sharp fall from its 102nd place in last year's survey.

    "Corruption isn't a natural disaster: It is the cold, calculated theft of opportunity from the men, women and children who are least able to protect themselves," said David Nussbaum, TI's chief executive.

    "Leaders must go beyond lip service and make good on their promises to provide the commitment and resources to improve governance, transparency and accountability."

    RP is 117th among 159

    Among the countries included in the index, corruption was perceived as most rampant in Chad, Bangladesh, Turkmenistan, Burma (Myanmar) and Haiti, which scored 1.7-1.8. They were also among the poorest countries in the world.

    The Philippines' score deteriorated from last year's 2.6 in the coalition's CPI.

    Out of 159 countries rated, the Philippines placed 117th in a tie with Afghanistan, Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guayana, Libya, Nepal and Uganda.

    More than two-thirds of the 159 nations surveyed by Transparency International scored less than five in this year's rating.

    The 'cleanest'

    On the other hand, the top 10 scorers were Iceland (9.7), Finland and New Zealand (9.6), Denmark (9.5), Singapore (9.4), Sweden (9.2), Switzerland (9.1), Norway (8.9), Australia (8.8) and Austria (8.7).

    The United States ranked 17th with a score of 7.6 and Japan shared the 21st ranking with Chile at 7.3.

    The CPI is a composite survey, reflecting the perceptions of business people and country analysts, both resident and nonresident. The composite survey also draws on 16 different polls from 10 independent institutions.

    But the index provides only a snapshot, with less capacity to offer year-to-year trends.

    The 2005 index bears witness to the double burden of poverty and corruption borne by the world's least developed countries, TI said.

    Major cause of poverty

    "Corruption is a major cause of poverty as well as a barrier to overcoming it," said TI chair Peter Eigen.

    "The two scourges feed off each other, locking their populations in a cycle of misery. Corruption must be vigorously addressed if aid is to make a real difference in freeing people from poverty."

    Extensive research shows that foreign investment is lower in countries perceived to be corrupt, which further thwarts their chance to prosper, according to TI.

    But when countries improve governance and reduce corruption, they reap a "development dividend" that, according to the World Bank Institute, can include improved child mortality rates, higher per capita income and greater literacy.

    The TI report noted that 19 of the world's poorest countries had been granted debt service relief under the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative, testifying to their economic reform achievements. However, not one of these countries scored above 4 on the CPI, indicating serious to severe levels of corruption.

    Greed, mismanagement

    The coalition said these countries still faced the grave risk that money freed from debt payments now entering national budgets would be forfeited to greed, waste or mismanagement.

    It said the commitment and resources devoted to qualifying for HIPC must also be applied to winning the fight against corruption.

    Stamping out corruption and implementing recipient-led reforms are thus seen as critical to making aid more effective, and to realizing the crucial human and economic development goals that have been set by the international community.

    An increase in perceived corruption from 2004 to 2005 can be measured in countries such as Costa Rica, Gabon, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Russia, Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago and Uruguay.

    Graft in rich countries

    Conversely, a number of countries and territories show noteworthy improvements -- a decline in perceptions of corruption -- over the past year. They include Estonia, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Qatar, Taiwan and Turkey.

    The report said wealth was not a prerequisite for successful control of corruption.

    A new long-term analysis of the CPI carried out by corruption expert Johann Graf Lambsdorff showed that the perception of corruption had decreased significantly in lower-income countries such as Estonia, Colombia and Bulgaria over the past decade.

    In the case of higher-income countries, such as Canada and Ireland, however, there has been a marked increase in the perception of corruption over the past 10 years, showing that even wealthy, high-scoring countries must work to maintain a climate of integrity.

    Sharing the burden

    Similarly, the responsibility in the fight against corruption does not fall solely on lower-income countries, the report said.

    The TI said wealthier countries, apart from facing numerous corruption cases within their own borders, must share the burden by ensuring that their companies were not involved in corrupt practices abroad.

    It also said offenders must be prosecuted and barred from public bidding.

    Government secrecy

    The opportunity for ensuring sustainable progress also lies in the hands of the World Trade Organization, which needs to actively promote transparency and anticorruption in global trade, the coalition stressed.

    "The lessons are clear: risk factors such as government secrecy, inappropriate influence of elite groups and distorted political finance apply to both wealthy and poorer countries, and no rich country is immune to the scourge of corruption," the report said.

  2. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    4,614
    #2
    nothing to be surprised about... ho hum... move along now...

    we've known this for ourselves since the 1940s. hehehe.
    Last edited by mbt; October 19th, 2005 at 11:09 PM.

  3. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    2,307
    #3
    tell us something we dont know :D hehehe depressing. .
    Got Mazda?-http://www.MAZDAtech.org [SIZE="1"]est. 2000[/SIZE]
    got mazda 2? -> mazda2ners

  4. Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    556
    #4
    God help us.

  5. Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    #5
    we are our own enemies.

  6. Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    21,346
    #6
    Sikat na naman tayo!

  7. Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    121
    #7
    nakakasawa na ang mga balitang ganyan. we all know that corruption in the philippines is severe, but we don't do anything about it. corruption is the cancer of the Philippines and its people.

  8. Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    1,327
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jvm13
    nakakasawa na ang mga balitang ganyan. we all know that corruption in the philippines is severe, but we don't do anything about it. corruption is the cancer of the Philippines and its people.
    We deserved it

  9. Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    143
    #9
    hay naku, if we want to recover from all these humiliation, our officials should start creating programs that could help improve our country's present situation no matter how unpopular their decision can be, do more selfless acts of service to their fellowmen and stop all these bickering and finger-pointing behavior

  10. Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    994
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by explorer

    "Corruption is a major cause of poverty as well as a barrier to overcoming it," said TI chair Peter Eigen.

    "The two scourges feed off each other, locking their populations in a cycle of misery. Corruption must be vigorously addressed if aid is to make a real difference in freeing people from poverty."
    saktong sakto ang sagot!!

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Int'l survey rates RP's corruption severe