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  1. Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,249
    #11
    Naia 3 is much much better than naia1 even 2. Its small compared to the other asian airports though. Heck, its even smaller than the guangzhou international airport, which I was able to use last year. This is in the province of shenzen, those who go to hongkong would know where shenzen is. This airport is even considered a "provincial" international airport but costs 10x more, and handles much more planes and passenger traffic than naia3. Naia3 won't do much either because of poor runway design and access roads. Then again, its better than the dinosaur we call our international airport.

  2. Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    659
    #12
    Definite na ba na mabuksan ito this year?! Sana naman!! What's the latest news?

  3. Join Date
    May 2004
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    659
    #13
    [SIZE=3]Airlines say they can't meet NAIA 3 deadline[/SIZE]

    Posted 00:42am (Mla time) Feb 27, 2005
    By Nikko Dizon
    Inquirer News Service



    Editor's Note: Published on page A8 of the Feb. 27, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

    AIRLINE companies will not be able to meet the June 21 scheduled opening of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport's (NAIA’s) Terminal 3 because of time constraints, according to Leoncio Nakpil, chair of the Airline Operators' Council (AOC).

    Nakpil said the airlines would need six months to make the transfer from the old Terminal 1, as they would need this much time to construct their offices and their passenger lounges, and to set up their computer systems, among others.

    He said the AOC and the Board of Airline Representatives (BAR) have informed Alfonso Cusi, general manager of the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA), by letter that the airlines would not make the deadline.

    The AOC represents officials from 29 airline companies and seven ground handlers, while the BAR is made up of airline country managers.

    Nakpil said the construction of an airline office is a lot more complicated than that of an ordinary office space, mainly because of the network of computer systems that have to be installed to ensure the airline's smooth operations.

    "We are still supporting the MIAA on the opening of the new terminal. The MIAA is bent on opening NAIA 3 in June. But it's like opening a door of a house without the door. How can you open an airport without the airlines?" he said.

    Nakpil said the six-month lead time that the airlines need would begin upon the signing of the final concessionaire lease contract with the MIAA.

    But he said the airline companies have yet to receive a copy of the draft contract despite the announcement that Cusi and Transportation Secretary Leandro Mendoza made on Feb. 18 that the contracts would be made available that week.

    Mendoza earlier said that the Office of the Solicitor General had given the go-signal for the MIAA to issue the airline companies their lease contracts.

    The government announced that the controversial airport terminal would open for operation on June 21 after it expropriated the facility from builder Philippine Air Terminals Co. (PIATCo) last December.

    Legal cases over NAIA 3 are pending before the Supreme Court and two international arbitration courts.

    The AOC earlier said it would take from three weeks to a month to have a final contract approved.

    Nakpil said the draft contract has to go to the airline company's headquarters abroad for review and comments before being sent back to the Philippines. Then the MIAA has to approve and prepare the final revised copy, before the company and the MIAA sign the contract.

    AOC members waited last Wednesday for the MIAA to release the draft contracts but were informed by Judith Dolot of the MIAA public affairs office that the draft had been sent to the OSG for review and revisions.

    In late January, the AOC expressed apprehension over the rush in the opening of the NAIA 3, saying that the tight deadline being given the airline companies could compromise security, safety and the standard of service.

    The AOC said the rushed deadline could even expose the airline companies to lawsuits from passengers.

  4. Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    659
    #14
    [SIZE=3]Palace puts disputed airport terminal up for sale[/SIZE]
    SOURCE:ABS-CBN NEWS, FRIDAY - MARCH 11, 2005

    Malacañan said on Thursday it would accept bids from investors willing to pay more than $300 million to acquire a new airport terminal seized from a consortium led by Germany's Fraport AG.

    Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita said the government would use the money to compensate the consortium known as Philippine International Air Terminal Co. Inc (PIATCO).

    "We are expecting in two weeks, at least, somebody to offer an unsolicited bid to acquire the airport," Ermita told a news conference.

    The government seized the terminal at Manila's international airport in December after a two-year deadlock.

    Ermita said three investors had expressed interest in the airport, which the government plans to open in June 21. He declined to give details.

    The terminal, designed to handle 13 million passengers per year, had been due to open late in 2002, but the Supreme Court invalidated the contract in May that year.

    The court ruled that the deal signed by the government of President Joseph Estrada, who was detained on corruption charges after he was removed from power in 2001, was illegal and fraught with irregularities.

    Fraport has sought World Bank arbitration to settle the dispute, accusing Philippine officials of accepting massive bribes.

    Manila has rejected its request for $425 million in compensation as too high and has threatened to bring criminal charges against the firm for offering bribes and breaking foreign-ownership laws.

    PIATCO is seeking $565 million in a separate suit filed with the International Commercial Court in Singapore.
    Reuters/abs-cbnNEWS.com

  5. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    13,417
    #15
    Who in the right mind will invest in this country, kung nascscam ka kahit ng govt hehe.

  6. Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    659
    #16
    Hinayaan na lang sana nilang mag-operate ang PIATCO while they conduct investigation keysa ginawa nila na two years hindi nakaka-operate ang airport, iilang years na lang sana ang naiwan if hinayaan nila ito, di po ba?!

    Ano na naman kaya ang gawin nila next? Ipapa-enlist nila sa Philippine Stock Exchange ito?? Who knows! Baka nga!
    Last edited by cyberdoc95; March 14th, 2005 at 03:16 AM.

  7. Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,202
    #17
    [SIZE=4]Gov’t mulls NAIA 1 burning to force Terminal 3 opening[/SIZE]


    Saturday, 04 02, 2005

    Plans are reportedly afoot among Arroyo govern-ment officials to get the old Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) to “accidentally” burn and force the transfer of international airlines and ground handling services as well as other concessionaires to the new NAIA Terminal 3, a industry source told the Tribune yesterday.

    The source explained that the plan is presently being discussed as a solution to force the airlines to move to new, state of the art terminal without going through the process of issuing iron-clad contracts to them, or persuade them to sign memorandums of agreement with the Manila International Airport Authority, as they would have nowhere else to go but NAIA 3.

    “This way too, the government can exercise ownership rights despite a court order, and even operate the new airport without having to shell out a single centavo to Piatco, since this would be seen as a 'force majeure',” the source said.

    Already, it was touch and go at the Naia yesterday after an accidental fire at a nearby factory resulted in temporarily casting a cloud of black smoke over the runway.

    At least three domestic flights were temporarily put to hold in the runways around 1:30 p.m. after the smoke from the fire from a burning factory at the nearby Kaingin road spewed smoke,several kilometers high.

    Winds cast the smoke over the runway.

    At least three midsized passenger aircrafts ,including ones bearing colors of Air Philippines,and Cebu Pacific were put on hold.

    Around 1:40 p.m.,a green military Hercules C-130 was allowed to lift off ahead of the passenger planes.

    Responding units from the volunteer fire brigades of the nearby Sto Nino and Dongalo baranggays put out the fire.

    A prop-driven Asian Spirit was seen landing immediately afte the smoke was suppressed.

    It was also learned that the Airline Operators Council (AOC), an organization of 29 international airlines and seven ground handling services companies privately expressed strong apprehension over the reported government's move which is short of forcing the airline companies operating at airport terminal 1 to transfer their operations at the controversial NAIA Terminal 3 before its scheduled opening in June.

    Some AOC members, who talked on condition of anonymity, telegraphed their fear that the government would create a scenario of a “force majeure” that would leave them no choice but to transfer their offices the controversial newly-built NAIA Terminal 3.

    Terminal 3 is currently embroiled in a legal battle between its builder, the Philippine International Air Terminals Co. (Piatco) and the Arroyo government over the issue of compensation, following President Arroyo's expropriation of the terminal.

    The issue of the compensation, a Pasay City Regional Trial Court ruled, should first be resolved before the government could take over, operate the terminal and exercise ownership rights.

    They cited an incident in the past, nine months before martial law was declared by former President Ferdinand Marcos, that the old Manila International Airport (MIA) Terminal was razed by a fire of suspicious origin on the night of Jan. 21, 1972 to make way for the emergency construction of the now NAIA Terminal 1.

    The Marcos government at that time, reportedly wanted to create a new authority to oversee the entire operations of the airport terminal that led to the creation of the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) and the building of a new international airport then called the Manila International Airport (MIA) Terminal.

    After the Edsa Revolt in 1986, however, then installed President Corazon Aquino had it renamed after her husband, who was slain in the airport tarmac on Aug. 17, 1987 by Republic Act 6639.

    The name Terminal 1 came after the completion of the NAIA Centennial Terminal 2 was completed in Dec. 28, 1998.

    Airport sources pointed out that the scenario of another airport burning which will then be projected as a “force majuere” is meant to force the opening of Terminal 3 for arrival operations only.

    All arrival flights will be operated at the NAIA Terminal 3, and all departure flights will be operated at the Philippine Village Hotel (PVH), located beside the NAIA Centennial Terminal 2.

    After check-in and exit clearing by Immigration officers at the PVH, departing passengers will be transferred by bus from PVII to NAIA Terminal 3, using the airport perimeter road where passengers will board their planes at the tarmac of NAIA Terminal 3. The plane will taxi out from the tarmac and head toward runway 06-24 for take-off.

    Sources also said that conducting arrival operations at the NAIA 3 will be easier than departure operations, as luggage of arriving, passengers can be manually operated on a flight to flight basis.

    AOC is said to be resisting the Arroyo administration's move for its members to transfer their operations from Terminal 1 to Terminal 3 before the scheduled opening, saying they need time to seek the approval of home office, as well as prepare for the funding for the transfer and refurbishing of their offices and the training of their employees.

    It was reported that the airline companies need at least six months from the issuance of the contract by the Manila International Airport Authority for them to transfer their offices to Terminal 3. Moreover, the plan to transfer international flight operations to terminal 3 will come at a time considered as peak season, and would cause confusion on all aspects of travel.

    The government wants Terminal 3 to be operational on June 21, But no foreign airline has so far transferred to the new terminal, Unless a situation of a “force majeure” reminiscent of the fire in January 1972 at the Old MIA Terminal comes about, there will not be a single foreign airline company operating. With additional reporting from Benjamin B. Pulta

  8. Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    659
    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by qman
    [SIZE=4]Gov’t mulls NAIA 1 burning to force Terminal 3 opening[/SIZE]


    Saturday, 04 02, 2005

    Plans are reportedly afoot among Arroyo govern-ment officials to get the old Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) to “accidentally” burn and force the transfer of international airlines and ground handling services as well as other concessionaires to the new NAIA Terminal 3, a industry source told the Tribune yesterday.

    The source explained that the plan is presently being discussed as a solution to force the airlines to move to new, state of the art terminal without going through the process of issuing iron-clad contracts to them, or persuade them to sign memorandums of agreement with the Manila International Airport Authority, as they would have nowhere else to go but NAIA 3.

    “This way too, the government can exercise ownership rights despite a court order, and even operate the new airport without having to shell out a single centavo to Piatco, since this would be seen as a 'force majeure',” the source said.

    Already, it was touch and go at the Naia yesterday after an accidental fire at a nearby factory resulted in temporarily casting a cloud of black smoke over the runway.

    At least three domestic flights were temporarily put to hold in the runways around 1:30 p.m. after the smoke from the fire from a burning factory at the nearby Kaingin road spewed smoke,several kilometers high.

    Winds cast the smoke over the runway.

    At least three midsized passenger aircrafts ,including ones bearing colors of Air Philippines,and Cebu Pacific were put on hold.

    Around 1:40 p.m.,a green military Hercules C-130 was allowed to lift off ahead of the passenger planes.

    Responding units from the volunteer fire brigades of the nearby Sto Nino and Dongalo baranggays put out the fire.

    A prop-driven Asian Spirit was seen landing immediately afte the smoke was suppressed.

    It was also learned that the Airline Operators Council (AOC), an organization of 29 international airlines and seven ground handling services companies privately expressed strong apprehension over the reported government's move which is short of forcing the airline companies operating at airport terminal 1 to transfer their operations at the controversial NAIA Terminal 3 before its scheduled opening in June.

    Some AOC members, who talked on condition of anonymity, telegraphed their fear that the government would create a scenario of a “force majeure” that would leave them no choice but to transfer their offices the controversial newly-built NAIA Terminal 3.

    Terminal 3 is currently embroiled in a legal battle between its builder, the Philippine International Air Terminals Co. (Piatco) and the Arroyo government over the issue of compensation, following President Arroyo's expropriation of the terminal.

    The issue of the compensation, a Pasay City Regional Trial Court ruled, should first be resolved before the government could take over, operate the terminal and exercise ownership rights.

    They cited an incident in the past, nine months before martial law was declared by former President Ferdinand Marcos, that the old Manila International Airport (MIA) Terminal was razed by a fire of suspicious origin on the night of Jan. 21, 1972 to make way for the emergency construction of the now NAIA Terminal 1.

    The Marcos government at that time, reportedly wanted to create a new authority to oversee the entire operations of the airport terminal that led to the creation of the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) and the building of a new international airport then called the Manila International Airport (MIA) Terminal.

    After the Edsa Revolt in 1986, however, then installed President Corazon Aquino had it renamed after her husband, who was slain in the airport tarmac on Aug. 17, 1987 by Republic Act 6639.

    The name Terminal 1 came after the completion of the NAIA Centennial Terminal 2 was completed in Dec. 28, 1998.

    Airport sources pointed out that the scenario of another airport burning which will then be projected as a “force majuere” is meant to force the opening of Terminal 3 for arrival operations only.

    All arrival flights will be operated at the NAIA Terminal 3, and all departure flights will be operated at the Philippine Village Hotel (PVH), located beside the NAIA Centennial Terminal 2.

    After check-in and exit clearing by Immigration officers at the PVH, departing passengers will be transferred by bus from PVII to NAIA Terminal 3, using the airport perimeter road where passengers will board their planes at the tarmac of NAIA Terminal 3. The plane will taxi out from the tarmac and head toward runway 06-24 for take-off.

    Sources also said that conducting arrival operations at the NAIA 3 will be easier than departure operations, as luggage of arriving, passengers can be manually operated on a flight to flight basis.

    AOC is said to be resisting the Arroyo administration's move for its members to transfer their operations from Terminal 1 to Terminal 3 before the scheduled opening, saying they need time to seek the approval of home office, as well as prepare for the funding for the transfer and refurbishing of their offices and the training of their employees.

    It was reported that the airline companies need at least six months from the issuance of the contract by the Manila International Airport Authority for them to transfer their offices to Terminal 3. Moreover, the plan to transfer international flight operations to terminal 3 will come at a time considered as peak season, and would cause confusion on all aspects of travel.

    The government wants Terminal 3 to be operational on June 21, But no foreign airline has so far transferred to the new terminal, Unless a situation of a “force majeure” reminiscent of the fire in January 1972 at the Old MIA Terminal comes about, there will not be a single foreign airline company operating. With additional reporting from Benjamin B. Pulta

    Kayo naman, another conspiracy theory na naman ito para mapaaga ang transfer??!!:bwahaha: He he he!! Buti nga kasi I'm getting sick of NAIA 1. Its really old. When they say na your impression of a country can be made as soon as you step on the airport upon arrival, this is really true! Sa dinadami ko nang napupuntahang bansa at naglalakihang airports, kapag bumibisita ako ng Pinas ay napakasakit tingnan na napakaluma na ng airport sa atin, unless you fly PAL sa NAIA 2. But majority of flights ay nasa NAIA 1 pa rin.

    Hindi lang siya luma, napakaliit pa. You can't help but really point to the government and say: "hoy mga magnanakaw, pwede ba magpagawa naman kayo ng desenteng airport. Sa bilyones na nautang ng Pilipinas, wala lang ba napunta sa pag-renovate ng airport or pagpapagawa ng bago?!"

    Yun lang Po! PEACE!

  9. Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    4,867
    #19
    arsonista talaga mga pinoy. heheh.

  10. Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,202
    #20
    Gov’t resets NAIA 3 opening ‘on or before December’


    Wednesday, 06 01, 2005

    A new terminal at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) will not be able to open this month, contrary to Malacaٌang's announcement a few months back.

    Instead, Department of Transportation and Commu-nications Secretary Leandro Mendoza yesterday said Terminal 3 can start operating “on or before December” this year.

    Mendoza cited an agreement between the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) and the terminal's builder Takenaka, a Japanese firm, wherein the latter will “finish” the project.

    The agreement provides for a price reduction for extending the runway by 1,998 meters to give large aircraft more room to maneuver and for finishing the terminal.

    In it, the Philippine government also states that it wants Takenaka to drop its plea for an indemnity provision, which would protect it from any lawsuit that the government might file against the Terminal 3 contractor, Philippine International Air Terminals Co. Inc. (Piatco).

    Mendoza warned that if Takenaka does not agree to the terms, the Arroyo administration will have to hire another builder to finish the job.

    The DoTC described replacing Takenaka as “Plan B” because for it to do so would delay the opening of Terminal 3 for at least three months.

    MIAA General Manager Alfonso Cusi also yesterday confirmed that the state-of-the-art terminal is being rehabilitated but stressed that it is “not extensive” and that the airport management is doing its usual maintenance work for the safety of passengers.

    “We are just following the legal process,” Cusi told reporters.

    Industry sources, however, also yesterday said replacing Takenaka would be impossible, adding if the Japanese firm is booted out, it would never cooperate with the Philippine government on the turnover of documents, plans and blueprints, which it holds.

    The sources also warned that the government could also face a big lawsuit if indeed the government would replace Takenaka.

    Piatco, with German partner Fraport AG, began the Terminal 3 project during the Estrada administration and had nearly completed it when now President Gloria Arroyo and later the Supreme Court nullified the contract.

    The international consortium has sued the Philippine government in international courts in Singapore and the United States.

    The Arroyo administration took over the project late last year and promised to operate it in six months.

    A few months before the self-imposed deadline, Malacaٌang had admitted that they could no longer open Terminal 3 on June 21, citing the rehabilitation work.

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