New and Used Car Talk Reviews Hot Cars Comparison Automotive Community

The Largest Car Forum in the Philippines



Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 66
  1. Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    554
    #31
    Kung mga long driving na walang traffic.... gamit ko v-power kz mas matipid, pero kung driving metro manila ... super unleaded lang ako... sayang susunugin lang ang v-power sa traffic.

  2. Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2
    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by RS Sprint View Post
    Cale,

    The grading system for fuels here in the Philippines is different from the US. Ours is similar to what is used in Japan and in Europe.

    AFAIK our 97 Octane fuel is equivalent to a 94 in the US.
    hi! i'm new here and out of curiosity, i was looking into the octane rating used in Philippines vs US at dito ako napadpad. anyway after some internet researching I think both countries are using the same octane rating system. before that, a post i found at hondaswap.com briefly describes in lay terms the different octane ratings used around world.

    " In Europe 98-octane gasoline is common and in Japan even 100-octane is readily available at the pumps, but this octane nomenclature is misleading to Americans as foreign octane ratings are derived entirely differently from our own... So, like every other measurement system it seems that everyone else uses a different scale than we do, but unlike most other instances where we have had the good sense to create different units of measure in this case we all use the same name...
    Japan and Europe use a system called RON or Research Octane Number to determine the octane rating of their gasoline, while stateside we use a system called AKI or Anti-Knock Index to determine gasoline's octane rating... Interestingly, to further complicate things it would seem that our own AKI system is actually derived from the average of the RON system and another more complicated system referred to as MON or Motor Octane Number... So, to recap our methodologies for measuring gasoline's octane rating are different, but share some common elements...
    So, with the commonality of RON in mind a good rule of thumb is as follows, multiply the foreign RON Octane rating by 0.95 and you will have the US AKI equivalent.

    ( RON Octane Rating x 0.95 = AKI Octane Rating )
    98 RON Octane x 0.95 = 93.1 AKI Octane (US measure)
    100 RON Octane x 0.95 = 95 AKI Octane (US measure)

    So, as you can see the 93 or 94 octane fuel we are all paying an arm and a leg for is actually quite comparable to the higher octane fuels found in Europe and Japan. The people whom have to worry about low octane rating are our friends out west in places like California that are subjected to substandard 91 octane.
    91 AKI Octane (US measure) = 95.5 RON Octane"

    here's the link for reference: http://hondaswap.com/reference-mater...ratings-59435/

    now, how did i end up thinking that both US and Philippines use the same rating? my answer is its in the law..RA 8749 or the Clean Air Act. Sec 26 says ".. no person shall manufacture, import, sell, supply, offer for sale, dispense, transport or introduce into commerce unleaded premium gasoline fuel which has an anti-knock index (AKI) of not less than 87.5 and Reid vapor pressure of not more than 9 psi." i'm not saying that this is the law that specifically states the use of the AKI system. i presume that since the law has used the AKI system it must be the system currently in use.

  3. Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,310
    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by n773ph View Post
    now, how did i end up thinking that both US and Philippines use the same rating? my answer is its in the law..RA 8749 or the Clean Air Act. Sec 26 says ".. no person shall manufacture, import, sell, supply, offer for sale, dispense, transport or introduce into commerce unleaded premium gasoline fuel which has an anti-knock index (AKI) of not less than 87.5 and Reid vapor pressure of not more than 9 psi." i'm not saying that this is the law that specifically states the use of the AKI system. i presume that since the law has used the AKI system it must be the system currently in use.
    Not necessarily. Gas stations here use RON not the AKI rating system.

    AKI of 87.5 is equivalent to around 92-93 RON. Entry level unleaded fuel sold here (assuming the fuel isn't adulterated) is 93 RON, which means our gas stations are still compliant even though they use the RON rating and the law uses AKI.

  4. Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    185
    #34
    WOW! just found out that it says on the gas cover of our CRV "unleaded only" pero we've always used shell premium and caltex gold (which is the equivalent of shell premium i think..).

    all this time unleaded pala dapat, should we switch to shell unleaded or caltex silver?

  5. Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    832
    #35
    Quote Originally Posted by supercar10 View Post
    WOW! just found out that it says on the gas cover of our CRV "unleaded only" pero we've always used shell premium and caltex gold (which is the equivalent of shell premium i think..).

    all this time unleaded pala dapat, should we switch to shell unleaded or caltex silver?
    Sir, we only got two types here in the Phils. Unleaded and Diesel
    Unleaded only has different ocatane ratings. Shell Premium and Caltex Gold are still unleaded but termed as Premium because of higher octane rating, which is normally on 95 RON. Sea Oil has one premium (Extreme) that has 97 RON.

    Diesel is of course diesel. Some are synthetic and others are biodiesels.

    LPG is also one.
    Last edited by Taurus; August 25th, 2009 at 05:42 PM.

  6. Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,841
    #36
    *bumping this thread

    Am just curious, the label on Shell gas stations seem to indicate that premium and unleaded both have 93 octane ratings.

    I'm guessing nagkaiba lang sila dahil sa additives.

    what's the advantage of using premium over unleaded then? (are the additives any good?)

  7. Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    156
    #37
    ^ Same question here. Any reason why we should choose the premium over the unleaded?

  8. Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    2,341
    #38
    something i just googled now


    REGULAR VERSUS PREMIUM GASOLINE
    Regular Gasoline Has As Much Merit As Premium Gasoline
    "Put a tiger in your tank," says a classic advertising tagline. In today's motoring world, what kind of fuel grade will have the power to place a beast in your gas tank?



    The answer, according to experts who study fuel efficiency in detail, is both regular and premium gasoline. And it would be a waste of money to favor premium over regular, especially in these times when gasoline prices are high, according to the experts.



    Virtually nothing is gained by filling up with a premium or more expensive grade of fuel than the vehicle manufacturer has recommended, the experts say. And many of the same experts explain that drivers may not lose much performance from their cars by using a lower grade of fuel than recommended by the car manufacturer.
    There is little difference in energy content of regular versus premium gasoline. They both contain about 111,400 British Thermal Units of energy per gallon.



    The price difference, however, between the fuel grades is anywhere from 20 cents to 40 cents, depending on where you live in the United States. The experts' consensus goes against the long-held belief by thousand of drivers who fill up with premium only, or on every third or fourth trip to the pump. The idea is to fill up with premium every so often to clean out the engines or rev up the performance of older engines.
    But according to the experts, this practice is like tossing quarters in a wishing well, since most engines are designed to operate on relatively low-octane regular unleaded gasoline.



    Octane is defined as a fuel's resistance to knocking. There is no benefit if the octane is higher than what the engine needs. Engine knock occurs when fuel in a combustion chamber ignites before it should. This disrupts the engine's operation. But electronic knock sensors are now common and have nearly eliminated engine disruption.



    The American Petroleum Institute says if you find that your car runs fine on a lower grade, there is no sense switching to premium. The Institute recommends following manufacturer's recommendation, but even those manufacturers say that it is more of a suggestion than a command.



    source: http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/...s_premium.html

    another one: http://www.epinions.com/content_2346164356

  9. Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,078
    #39
    Depende sa makina mo at modelo ng sasakyan kung Nissan Exalta STA . May nakalagay sa instrument panel na use only 95 octane meaning premium gasoline here in the philippines.

  10. Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,841
    #40
    ^^ sa shell kasi, yung premium at super unleaded parehas 93 octane

    yung v-power yung 95 octane

    hmmm. nung nagdrive kami sa probinsya, ano yung "regular" na gas? walang super unleaded or caltex silver or xtra unleaded, meron lang premium at "regular"

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Lets talk about gas!