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  1. Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    11
    #1
    [SIZE=3]Share ko lang po... I recievd the email thru yahoo groups[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3]This technology is already a reality on large marine diesel applications for both four stroke and 2 stroke engines especially on LNG vessels wherein boil off gas or excess pressure gas from the cargo tank normally released to the atmosphere is collected and used as fuel for the boilers to produce steam for steam turbines and most recently on diesel main engines. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE=3]quote[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3]Our company who is a pioneer in converting automotive Diesel engines to run on combined Diesel and LPG have gone another step ahead as we are to convert small marine diesel engines of some fishings companies ( Damalerio and Tan group) which are based in GenSan. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE=3]With this, we have created another company solely to cater the marine industry and[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3]provide the technology for marine applications. We will be teaming with Petronas[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3]who will will be supplying the LPG.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=3]Audio-Video presentation of our products can be viewed at youtube.com. Just type macro otomasters inc. in the search bar.[/SIZE]
    unquote

    here's the link

    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...otomasters+inc

  2. Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    11
    #2
    Additional info I found on the web for marine applications, its good that there's a Filipino company pioneering the gas/diesel engine for automotive applications here in the Philippines. LPG is about 20-30 percent cheaper than
    diesel and it would definitely reduce pollution. How much kaya is the coversion?

    ------
    Abstract
    In the mid-1980’s Wärtsilä started the development of four-stroke gas engines. The first gas engine concept was the Gas Diesel engine with high-pressure gas injection. One of the merits is the “multi-fuel capability” that means that the same engine can run on a wide variety of fuels as crude oil, natural gas and heavy fuel oil. The concept has so far been developed for the Wärtsilä 32GD and the Wärtsilä 46GD diesel engines covering an output range from 1.5 to 17.6 MW.
    In 1992 the development of lean-burn, spark ignited gas engines started. The first engine, the Wärtsilä 25SG, was released in 1993 and today a complete engine programme ranging from about 2 to 8 MW has been developed. The largest is the Wärtsilä 34SG, which was introduced in 1995. Other lean-burn engines are Wärtsilä 220SG and Wärtsilä 28SG. The component design relies on the latest predictive design tools for simulation and calculation, combined with the vast experience of Wärtsilä built up during the years.
    In 1996 the development of the lean-burn, dual-fuel engines started. The first engine, the Wärtsilä 32DF, was started in 1997. The engine programme ranging from 4.0 MW to 17.1 MW has been developed. The largest unit is the Wärtsilä 50DF. One of the merits is the fuel versatility that means that the same engine can be run on gaseous as well as liquid fuels. When running in gas mode the engine is working according to the Otto process where the lean air-fuel mixture is fed to the cylinder during the suction stroke. When running in diesel mode the engine is working according to the Diesel process where the diesel fuel is fed to the cylinder in the end of the compression stroke. The engine is optimised for running on gaseous fuels and the diesel fuel is used for back-up fuel operation. When running in gas mode it is possible to instantly transfer to back-up fuel operation at any load in case of an alarm situation, e.g. interruptions in gas supply. When the situation is normalised it is possible to transfer back to gas mode at any load.
    In a lean-burn gas engine the mixture of air and fuel in the cylinder is lean, i.e. there is more air present in the cylinder than is needed for the combustion. At leaner combustion, less NOx is produced and the efficiency can be increased by using higher compression ratio and higher output. A lean mixture is also required to avoid knocking or self-ignition. The engine efficiency of up to 45% of today will rise in the larger engines to 50% in the near future. The emission values meet even the stringent German requirement “½TA-luft” (250 mg/Nm³ NOx and 325 mg/Nm³ CO, both at 5% O2). In order to meet the goals a number of new features were introduced. The most revolutionary is the common rail pilot fuel system and the computerised control system. Lean-burn combustion is a sensitive process and variations in ambient conditions, gas quality, wear of engine components etc., may cause an individual cylinder to run either too lean towards misfiring or too rich towards knocking. In order to stabilise the ignition and combustion of the lean mixture and to avoid misfiring a powerful ignition source is needed. The ignition is initiated by injecting a small amount of diesel fuel igniting the lean main fuel charge in the cylinder. The amount of diesel fuel is below one percent of the total fuel consumption on full load. A pump unit, controlled by the engine control system, elevates the pilot fuel pressure to the required level. The high-pressure pilot fuel is delivered to a common rail and further to the feed pipes into each individual injection valve. The injection valve is a two-needle design, one for full load diesel operation and one for pilot fuel in gas mode operation. The pilot fuel needle is solenoid operated allowing exact timing and duration for each cylinder and is individually adjusted during operation for optimal performance.

    Introduction

    Based on extensive experience of development and production of dual-fuel gas diesel engines and pure lean-burn gas engines since the end of 1980s, the development of dual-fuel lean-burn gas engines got under way in 1996 and the first engine, a Wärtsilä 32DF, was started in 1997. One of its major merits is fuel versatility, which means that the same engine can be run on gaseous as well as liquid fuels. When running in gas mode, the engine works according to the Otto process, where a lean air-fuel mixture is fed to the cylinders during the suction stroke and ignited with a small amount of diesel fuel at the end of compression stroke, fig 2. When running in diesel mode, also called back-up fuel mode, the engine works according to the Diesel process where the diesel fuel is fed into the cylinder at the end of the compression stroke.

    Fig 2. Operating principle in gas mode
    In a lean-burn gas engine the mixture of air and fuel in the cylinder is lean, i.e. there is more air present in the cylinder than is needed for the combustion. At leaner combustion, less NOx is produced and the efficiency can be increased by using a higher compression ratio and higher BMEP (Break Mean Effective Pressure). A lean mixture is also required to avoid knocking or self-ignition. A powerful ignition source is needed to stabilize the ignition and combustion of the lean mixture and to avoid misfiring. The ignition is initiated by injecting a small amount of diesel fuel, igniting the lean main fuel charge in the cylinder. The amount of diesel fuel is below one percent of the total fuel consumption on full load. Lean-burn combustion is a sensitive process and variations in ambient conditions, gas quality, wear of engine components etc., may cause an individual cylinder to run either too lean towards misfiring or too rich towards knocking. Therefore it is of the utmost importance to have an intelligent control system to maintain high engine efficiency and output at low emissions.



  3. Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    9,720
    #3
    The engine is optimised for running on gaseous fuels and the diesel fuel is used for back-up fuel operation.
    hmm...akala ko a little diesel is still needed for combustion...

Diesel to LPG/Diesel conversion Technology