New and Used Car Talk Reviews Hot Cars Comparison Automotive Community

The Largest Car Forum in the Philippines



Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    8
    #1
    Hi peeps. I知 trying to get opinions from car owners here. I値l buying my first car soon and I知 torn between the 2011 Focus 2.0L Sport AT and 2011 Chevy LS AT. Here are my pros for each (please feel free to correct me if I知 wrong):

    Focus
    Style
    FC and power (since diesel)
    Resale value (? not sure though)

    Chevy
    Space (driver, passengers and cargo)
    Warranty length
    Built (no major potential defects based on forum browsing only)
    After-sales service (Heard ford has pricier casa parts and worse service)

    Please help. Hirap mag-decide.

  2. Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,093
    #2
    Focus is due to be changed, tho. Cruze also has diesel, iirc.

  3. Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,236
    #3
    Are you looking at the diesel variants of both? If so, I'd definitely get the Cruze between the two. Its got excellent handling to go with the powerful engine and also much, much better looks. For me, the Focus looks outdated and quirky both inside and out. I find the pre-facelift version to look better. But if you can wait,l I suggest you do so for the upcoming all new Focus. This should put up a better fight.

  4. Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    8
    #4
    *jave *GTi Kelan ba expected release ng 2012 focus? Mukhang next year pa eh. I'm planning to buy this month.
    And the cruze diesel mejo pricey. 1.2M SRP? My budget is below 1M. I'm looking at the Focus diesel variant vs. Cruze unleaded.

    Right now, I'm favoring yung Cruze. What do you guys think?

  5. Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    22,710
    #5
    The Focus still handles better than the Cruze. The Cruze has a better ride, though.

    Ang pagbalik ng comeback...

  6. Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    8
    #6
    Yung issue ko talaga is the total cost down the line. Which one would be harder to maintain? And the japanese cars are out of the question, di ko gano gusto yung porma nila.

  7. Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    22,710
    #7
    Total costs are unknown. But if you really want the lowest total costs, buy a secondhand Isuzu Crosswind and drive it till it falls apart.



    But seriously... Total costs will depend on how many kilometers you drive every year, unforseen/emergency repairs along the way, and how long you plan to keep the car. They should be similar, but note that the Focus, being merely a facelift, shares parts with previous Focus models.


    For gas:

    The Focus engine hasn't changed much. There's parts commonality between the 2.0 and the 1.8, and some aftermarket parts interchange between the Focus and the Mazda3 (though there are valvetrain, ECU-programming and internal transmission differences). Lots of sources for these parts, already... The 1.8 MT is particularly fun, though the interior sucks compared to the hatchback.

    The Cruze is all-new, so the parts supply isn't there yet. But if it's popular enough, the traditional Chevy parts suppliers (like Thunder) should carry anything you'll need in the future. The gearshift doesn't feel quite as high-quality as in the Focus, though the rest of the interior is better. Steers well, but the Focus steers better.

    Long-term costs will be similar to other 1.8 liter cars (barring any unforseen defects). With the Focus, you're getting a relatively trouble free car in its last generation. Most of the early issues (electrical, CV Joint) were ironed out with the pre-facelift. The only big difference is the stiffer suspension and some trim. Everything else is the same. Both cars have longer oil change intervals than their diesel counterparts, which keeps overall costs similar, barring any huge oil price jumps in the future.

    The one thing that will suck is resale... people don't want big engined cars... I'm not quite sure if the 1.8s will count as "big engined" five years down the line when Honda Fits and Toyota Yarii have 1.8 liter engines and are as big as Starexes... but you never know...

    For the diesels:

    Focus: The computer box and transmission are all-new, and the front-springs and geometry feel different, but for turbos, sensors, injectors, shocks, brakes and miscellaneous trim pieces, you should be able to use stuff from the previous generation Focus... and there are sources for many things and work-arounds for others. If you log in to the forums at Fordclubph.com, you can find resources for out-of-casa maintenance.

    With the Cruze, you're getting an all-new diesel, albeit one shared with the Captiva, so there's some commonality there. Durability and maintenance are an unknown.

    Neither car will be as simple to care for in the long-long run (150,000 kilometers plus) as their gasoline counterparts. Diesel quality here is still a joke, and these modern turbochargers are sensitive to poor maintenance and abuse. If you plan to keep them for about 80-100,000 kilometers, they're decent value, and at least the diesel engines will keep their resale value up against the negative "poor fuel economy" image (image: perception: in other words, what people think rather than the reality of the situation...) of American makes.

    Ang pagbalik ng comeback...

  8. Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    8
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by niky View Post
    Total costs are unknown. But if you really want the lowest total costs, buy a secondhand Isuzu Crosswind and drive it till it falls apart.



    But seriously... Total costs will depend on how many kilometers you drive every year, unforseen/emergency repairs along the way, and how long you plan to keep the car. They should be similar, but note that the Focus, being merely a facelift, shares parts with previous Focus models.


    For gas:

    The Focus engine hasn't changed much. There's parts commonality between the 2.0 and the 1.8, and some aftermarket parts interchange between the Focus and the Mazda3 (though there are valvetrain, ECU-programming and internal transmission differences). Lots of sources for these parts, already... The 1.8 MT is particularly fun, though the interior sucks compared to the hatchback.

    The Cruze is all-new, so the parts supply isn't there yet. But if it's popular enough, the traditional Chevy parts suppliers (like Thunder) should carry anything you'll need in the future. The gearshift doesn't feel quite as high-quality as in the Focus, though the rest of the interior is better. Steers well, but the Focus steers better.

    Long-term costs will be similar to other 1.8 liter cars (barring any unforseen defects). With the Focus, you're getting a relatively trouble free car in its last generation. Most of the early issues (electrical, CV Joint) were ironed out with the pre-facelift. The only big difference is the stiffer suspension and some trim. Everything else is the same. Both cars have longer oil change intervals than their diesel counterparts, which keeps overall costs similar, barring any huge oil price jumps in the future.

    The one thing that will suck is resale... people don't want big engined cars... I'm not quite sure if the 1.8s will count as "big engined" five years down the line when Honda Fits and Toyota Yarii have 1.8 liter engines and are as big as Starexes... but you never know...

    For the diesels:

    Focus: The computer box and transmission are all-new, and the front-springs and geometry feel different, but for turbos, sensors, injectors, shocks, brakes and miscellaneous trim pieces, you should be able to use stuff from the previous generation Focus... and there are sources for many things and work-arounds for others. If you log in to the forums at Fordclubph.com, you can find resources for out-of-casa maintenance.

    With the Cruze, you're getting an all-new diesel, albeit one shared with the Captiva, so there's some commonality there. Durability and maintenance are an unknown.

    Neither car will be as simple to care for in the long-long run (150,000 kilometers plus) as their gasoline counterparts. Diesel quality here is still a joke, and these modern turbochargers are sensitive to poor maintenance and abuse. If you plan to keep them for about 80-100,000 kilometers, they're decent value, and at least the diesel engines will keep their resale value up against the negative "poor fuel economy" image (image: perception: in other words, what people think rather than the reality of the situation...) of American makes.

    Thanks niky. So basically you're saying it wouldn't be ideal to get a diesel engine if I'm planning to keep it for as long as I could? tsk, tsk.. Talo talaga sa maintenance pag-diesel. Mukhang gasoline-run Cruze na. But I think I'd still test drive the Focus. lol.. Just to feel it.

  9. #9
    I'd take a look at a diesel Cruze...

  10. Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,236
    #10
    If its the Cruze gasoline versus the Focus diesel, then the Focus has more of a chance. Its definitely got more performance than the Cruze 1.8LS which is known for being slow. And I believe naman that just about any good engine will serve you well if you take good care of it be it gas or diesel, old tech or new tech.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Help! 2011 Ford Focus vs 2011 Chevy Cruze