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  1. Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    641
    #1
    Share ko lang. I got this from my mailbox today.

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    CARJACKING: PREVENTION AND RESPONSE

    SITUATION

    There are reports of renewed increases in the incidence of carjacking in some areas
    of Metro Manila. Carjacking involves the forcible takeover/theft of a vehicle while
    someone is aboard, usually in transit. This is different from carnapping wherein the
    vehicle is taken while it is stationary and there is no one aboard it.

    MODUS OPERANDI

    A favored modus operandi of carjackers is to pretend to be persons in authority (e.g.
    police, military, NBI, intelligence services) and accost unwary motorists before
    divesting them of their vehicle, cash and other valuables. Carjackers using this
    method often ride in new model vehicles (more often than not without plate numbers
    or using unauthorized commemorative plates) complete with sirens/flashers,
    firearms and perhaps even official looking uniforms/identification and similar
    paraphernalia. Another modus operandi is the pretext of bumping into your vehicle
    and perpetrating the crime as you alight and check the damage. Other carjackers
    use multiple vehicles, sandwich you between them and force you of the road.

    Carjackers typically target motorists traveling alone late at night (e.g. 11 p.m. up to
    around 3 a.m.) along roads that are either deserted or have little
    vehicular/pedestrian traffic.

    Fast, new model cars are typically targeted since carjackers either sell them on the
    black market or use them as get away vehicles to perpetrate other crimes such as
    bank robberies.


    AREAS OF CONCERN

    There are several identified areas of concern in Metro Manila where carjacking
    incidents often happen:

    • Quezon Avenue underpass which crosses EDSA
    • Tomas Morato and West Triangle area in Quezon City
    • Teachers Village, Quezon City
    • Commonwealth Avenue, Quezon City
    • some stretches of EDSA in Quezon City
    • Katipunan Flyover coming from Libis, Quezon City

    Kindly note that although most incidents have been noted to occur in Quezon City,
    carjacking can happen anywhere.

    RECOMMENDATIONS

    Becoming the victim of a crime may be avoided or the effects mitigated. Below are
    some avoidance tips that you may consider:

    • Consider varying your daily routines and habits. Do not take the same routes
    or go at the same time on your regular errands. This will avoid establishing a
    pattern that criminals may notice.

    • Ensure that your vehicle is in good working condition in order to avoid vehicle
    breakdowns in potentially dangerous circumstances.

    • Know the areas you travel through and take note of potential safe havens
    such as police stations, gasoline stations, etc. so that in case of vehicle
    trouble, you have the option of trying to reach these areas if circumstances
    permit.

    • Avoid traveling during unholy hours of the night. If such is unavoidable (e.g.
    coming home from a party or a night out with friends), avoid traveling alone
    through areas likely to be favored by criminal elements such as those
    mentioned above.

    • Always be alert and aware of your surroundings. Constantly check your rear
    and side view mirrors. Note any suspicious looking vehicles that may be
    following you. Be wary of unmarked vehicles with flashers/sirens, without
    plate numbers/vanity plates or using unauthorized commemorative plates,
    carrying many passengers (predominantly male) and are more often than not,
    heavily tinted. Take note that the authorities normally travel in marked cars or
    with readily recognizable red government plates. Police and other law
    enforcement/military personnel in or out of uniform are also required to have
    credentials such as ID’s and appropriate badges with them.


    • If you suspect surveillance, try taking a few turns to see if the suspected
    vehicle follows you constantly. Be prepared to take evasive action and
    proceed to the nearest identified safe haven if possible. If warranted, contact
    the authorities.

    • Keep a means of emergency communications (e.g. mobile phone, handheld
    radio) handy for use in case of emergencies. Keep your
    colleagues/families/trusted friends aware of your whereabouts.

    In the event that you get caught by suspected carjackers:

    • Stop the vehicle and remain calm. If they present themselves as persons in
    authority, politely ask for credentials such as identification cards/badges.

    • Do not alight from the vehicle immediately. However, if perpetrators ask you
    to alight, follow their instructions. Leave the door open as you get of. Put your
    hands up if requested to do so.

    • Apply the handbrake but keep the engine running.

    • Avoid looking directly at the perpetrators. Be compliant with their demands.
    Your life is more valuable than any material possessions.

    • Allow the carjackers to depart without interference.

    • Take note of any details you can gather without unduly arousing their
    suspicions that you are gathering information for future investigations.

    • Report the incident as soon as possible to the authorities and SSU.
    Cooperate to the fullest extent possible during investigations.

    The following mitigation measures may also be considered:

    • Consider getting comprehensive insurance for your vehicle if such has not yet
    been done. New vehicles are routinely insured as such and it may be a good
    idea to continue this comprehensive insurance for a period of time as
    recommended by your insurance provider or auto dealer. Ensure that such
    insurance covers theft of your vehicle and other accessories thereof.

    • Keep a note of articles which you commonly place in your vehicle. It may also
    be useful to take a picture of your vehicle from various angles to assist in
    description to authorities in case of a carnapping/carjacking.

    • It may be prudent to avoid leaving the original paperwork (e.g. registration,
    insurance cover) inside your vehicle. This may make it easier for criminals to
    sell your vehicle to unsuspecting buyers. Have photocopies of such
    paperwork made and place them in your vehicle for use in case legitimate
    authorities wish to verify them (e.g. at checkpoints).


    • Consider having the vehicle plate number and other identifying
    marks/numbers etched/engraved on strategic areas (e.g. windshield, window
    glass, chassis) in order to make it harder for criminals to sell and to facilitate
    identification in case it is recovered by the authorities.

    Post-vehicle recovery recommendations:

    In the event that your vehicle is recovered by the authorities, this will be
    communicated to you.

    • Bring appropriate identification and proof of ownership (e.g. registration
    papers, driver’s license, deed of sale) when claiming your recovered vehicle.

    • Ensure that the authorities have removed your vehicle from the so-called “Al
    Points Bulletin” (APB) prior to using it. This is to avoid possible mis-encounters
    with anti-carnapping elements.


    USEFUL CONTACTS

    For Life-Threatening Emergencies Only
    Dial 1-1-7 or TEXT-SMS PATROL EYE or SMS: Type PNP <your message> then
    send to 2920

    For Highway Robbery & Other Motor Vehicle related crimes
    Dial (632) 722-4068 / (632) 725-1133 local 4359 PNP Task Force Limbas/ Anti-
    Carnapping

    For Complaints Referrals Action Center
    Dial (632) 722-0650 local 3453/3473

    For Non-Emergency Police Response
    Dial (632) 722-0650 4252 PNP Police Community Relations Group

    For Organized Crime & Kidnapping with Ransom
    Dial (632) 725-2147 Local 4371 PACER

    For Most Wanted / Missing or Unidentified Person
    Dial (632) 726-1575 Criminal Investigation & Detection Group

    For Motor Vehicle Related Transactions
    Dial (632) 724-8869 Traffic Management Group

    For Police Services Complaints or Complaints about a Police Officer
    Dial (632) 899-7504 Internal Affairs Service
    Last edited by WeaponX; October 22nd, 2005 at 10:37 AM.

  2. Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    344
    #2
    Thanks for posting. Malapit na Christmas, kaya sigurado tataas pa lalo ang mga ganyang kaso...tsk..tsk.

  3. Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,343
    #3
    I may add an item to the recommendations. Make sure your gas on almost empty level when traversing the high risk areas. This way, carjackers won't in any way have a heyday in the park. They'll surely stop, when the fuel runs out.

  4. Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,685
    #4
    sir thanks for the info.

  5. Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    739
    #5
    After analyzing all practical options, I figured the best choice is to subscribe to a vehicle tracking system. Your vehicle will be installed with a transponder which you can track online via the web.

    If you get carjacked, you can track your vehicle online and report its location to the police.

  6. Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,631
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by leinahtan
    I may add an item to the recommendations. Make sure your gas on almost empty level when traversing the high risk areas. This way, carjackers won't in any way have a heyday in the park. They'll surely stop, when the fuel runs out.
    Question lang, wouldn't this backfire on the victim? I mean, if there's an opportunity to escape, yet it's impossible to attempt when you're almost out of juice. And what if you didn't plan on passing through a high-risk area on a full tank, but eventually had to because of unavoidable circumstances?

    Plus, AFAIK, it's unhealthy to run the engine with the tank almost empty.

  7. Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    3,152
    #7
    yup lapit na cxmas, kutong cops mas be mistaken for perpetrator.

    meron kayang pedeng ilagay sa car tipong homing device...

  8. Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    8,078
    #8
    Add lang din ako ng mga hot spot

    1. Tandang Sora
    2.Congressional Road
    3.Roosevelt Avenue


    thnaks for the Nice valuable info ,sir Weapon X

  9. Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    739
    #9
    Check out this locally available vehicle tracking service:

    Vehicle tracking service from Smart Telecoms
    http://www.smart.com.ph/SMART/Value+...VS_AV_Avls.htm

    Track your car via text message
    http://www.trackme.com.ph/

    Disable your car via text message
    http://www.findme.com.ph/writeups/wh...mobillizer.htm

    Other vehicle tracking service companies
    http://www.ants.ph/main.htm

    I'm sure if the owners of those expensive vehicles knew about these kind of services, they probably would have recovered their vehicles by now and the carjackers busted.

    The question is, why are these services not heavily marketed?

  10. Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,343
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Bogeyman
    Question lang, wouldn't this backfire on the victim? I mean, if there's an opportunity to escape, yet it's impossible to attempt when you're almost out of juice. And what if you didn't plan on passing through a high-risk area on a full tank, but eventually had to because of unavoidable circumstances?

    Plus, AFAIK, it's unhealthy to run the engine with the tank almost empty.
    Then you may have to face the inevitable. Safe driving.

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Tips Against Carjacking