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  1. Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,159
    #1
    https://www.autoindustriya.com/auto-...nspection.html

    copy pasting the text:

    A lot has been said about the Motor Vehicle Inspection System (MVIS). Much like England's MoT(Ministry of Transport) test and Japan's Shaken, the MVIS is a strict roadworthiness check to ensure your car is in good health before you get it registered.

    On paper, it's a great idea. Not only will you know if your car is roadworthy or not, but it also keeps the clunkers off the road. It makes driving safer for everyone too. How many times did you almost hit the back of a car because it didn't have working brake lights? The MVIS test can minimize things like that from happening.

    But before you get your car inspected, what exactly do they need to check? A lot, as it turns out. Per LTO's Memorandum Circular No. 2020-2240, there are nearly 20 pages of things they will inspect. We've sifted it out for you so here's the rundown.

    Above carriage inspection

    The MVIS test is split in two, namely above carriage inspection and undercarriage inspection. Let's first take a closer look at the above carriage checks.

    It includes the body, the glass area, lights, and so on. This check also covers the interior, so make sure it's all tidy and in working order. For the body check, they will see if the vehicle has rust on the panels, and if everything is intact. Loose panels and duct-taped parts are a no-no. Also, your headlights shouldn't only be functional, these must be aligned and clear too. They'll also take a look at your turn signals, license plate lights, taillights, and reverse lights for good measure.

    But above carriage inspection goes beyond checking all the lights. The vehicle's windshields and windows must be spotless, so any cracks, deep scratches, or temporary repairs are an immediate fail. Your wipers must be functional and in good condition, along with the windshield washers. Tires are checked for tread depth and age, and regrooved tires are not allowed. The steering wheel shouldn't have unnecessary play and effort must be equal when turning left and right. The horn must have a consistent tone and volume when pressed for a long time.

    If that seems like a lot, we're not done yet. The interior is subject to checks as well. Your instrument cluster must be backlit and all dials should be accurate. The parking brake needs to be tight and be able to hold the car at an angle. At the same time, they will check if your brakes and clutch are up to scratch. Also, the rear-view and side-view mirrors should provide a clear view of the flanks and the back. Even the seats and seatbelts are inspected to see if it is safe for use.

    Other things for checking? MVIS inspectors will see to it that fumes do not enter the cabin, and the air-conditioning is filled with the proper refrigerant. As mentioned before, the exhaust system must not be louder than 99 dB. They'll even look at the floorboard if outside leaks are seeping into the cabin. The fuel tank and fuel delivery system will also get inspected for any signs of wear, damage, or bad repairs. Every switch and dial must be functional and the battery securely mounted.

    Undercarriage inspection

    Now that we've covered everything above the chassis, what do MVIS inspectors look out for under the car? They watch out for three key things, namely rust, suspension and mounting play, and leaks. They check leaks from the radiator, transmission, engine, power steering, hoses, pipes, brake lines, differentials, and dampers. Bushings, driveshafts, CV joints, linkages, steering, and engine mounts must be tight and free from play and vibrations.

    As for corrosion, there shouldn't be any in the hard points of the chassis and the floor pan. For pick-ups, traditional SUVs, AUVs, and vans (ex. Hilux, D-Max, Fortuner, mu-X), the inspectors take a closer look at the frame that serves as the backbone of the vehicle. They also check if there is damage, deformation, or cut and shut welds. Springs and handbrake cables are also checked, and the MVIS center makes sure that all nuts and bolts are properly installed in the car. For those who have spare tire mounts outside the vehicle, these must be secured properly and not at risk of falling off.

    Yes, it's a lot to take in, but it's all for the sake of safety. If any of the parts mentioned require immediate attention in your car, it's best to take it to the shop and do the repair and services needed before you schedule your MVIS center visit. You wouldn't want to go there only for your front license plate to be confiscated for failing the inspection.

  2. Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,159
    #2
    This seems pretty comprehensive! Mahihirapan na pumasa mga clunkers.

  3. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    38,863
    #3
    it will probably prove useful, in the used car market.
    such cars may command higher prices.

    but my beef is,
    "are they going to disqualify cars with deficiencies on items that are not even required by law?"
    i perused one such, somewhere here, and there were items in the list that, to my knowledge, are not required by our laws.

    so,
    what is the passing score?
    Last edited by dr. d; January 20th, 2021 at 11:39 PM.

  4. Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,001
    #4
    My questions is more on the following:

    1) why does the MVIS need to confiscate the front plate in the event of a "FAIL" finding?
    2) has LTO forgotten their previously "required" and supposedly enforced tamper proof bolts? What happens to those vehicles? Is the MVIS responsible for replacing the bolts and ensuring they are not going to damage the plate upon removal?
    3) Why remove the plate? You are still not able to register yet until you comply with MVIS? Why add the unneccessary penalty? If the MV is driven outside of registration after repeated failures, then that is on the owner if they continue to drive it around unregistered for the "current" year.
    4) There isn't a warning system in place for the MV as far as I could tell. They are just working with PASS or FAIL. But if it was tailored to be similar to MOT, I clearly remember vehicles bought with MOT having "flags" of where rust was found and that the owner should remedy as it did not yet warrant calling the vehicle "unroadworthy". If you watch shows like Car Throttle on Youtube, they buy old "cheap" cars with MOT that clearly have issues found but have a valid MOT. What gives?
    5) How many demerits or mistakes are you allowed to be given for a pass or is it just 1 item found with issue will constitute a FAIL in the report from MVIS, irregardless of severity?

  5. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    38,863
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by 17Sphynx17 View Post
    My questions is more on the following:

    1) why does the MVIS need to confiscate the front plate in the event of a "FAIL" finding?
    2) has LTO forgotten their previously "required" and supposedly enforced tamper proof bolts? What happens to those vehicles? Is the MVIS responsible for replacing the bolts and ensuring they are not going to damage the plate upon removal?
    3) Why remove the plate? You are still not able to register yet until you comply with MVIS? What add the unneccessary penalty? If the MV is driven outside of registration after repeated failures, then that is on the owner if they continue to drive it around unregistered for the "current" year.
    4) There isn't a warning system in place for the MV as far as I could tell. They are just working with PASS or FAIL. But if it was tailored to be similar to MOT, I clearly remember vehicles bought with MOT having "flags" of where rust was found and that the owner should remedy as it did not yet warrant calling the vehicle "unroadworthy". If you watch shows like Car Throttle on Youtube, they buy old "cheap" cars with MOT that clearly have issues found but have a valid MOT. What gives?
    i have a feeling,
    there will be modifications in the presumed first edition rules.

  6. Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10,828
    #6
    Palpak yan kasi Paano mga jeepney, bus, at tricycle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    38,863
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Egan101 View Post
    Palpak yan kasi Paano mga jeepney, bus, at tricycle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    ... will pasang masda and piston take to the streets...?
    will the authority stand fast, or will they give in?

  8. Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,001
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Egan101 View Post
    Palpak yan kasi Paano mga jeepney, bus, at tricycle.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Supposedly, to follow sila sa MVIS Requirement "daw" since konti pa lang ang MVIS.

    But once "live" na ang required number of MVIS operations/locations, mga for public transpo damay na, ang inspection pa ay semi-annual.

    https://www.autoindustriya.com/auto-...s-testing.html

    "However, these PUVs don't have to do the test at the moment. For now, all they have to do is take the emissions test, just like before. That's because there is still a shortage of MVICs, and accommodating all of these will make the lines long in operational inspection centers. That said, PUVs will have to undergo inspection once there are more MVICs in place. Our source says these vehicles will have to take it “soon”."

    "Here's the tougher part. Once the PUV is five years old, it needs to be inspected semi-annually. Yes, vehicles used for public transport that are beyond five years old need to take the test twice a year. Again, that's according to the Circular released by the LTO."

  9. Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    239
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kamiya View Post
    https://www.autoindustriya.com/auto-...nspection.html

    copy pasting the text:

    A lot has been said about the Motor Vehicle Inspection System (MVIS). Much like England's MoT(Ministry of Transport) test and Japan's Shaken, the MVIS is a strict roadworthiness check to ensure your car is in good health before you get it registered.

    On paper, it's a great idea. Not only will you know if your car is roadworthy or not, but it also keeps the clunkers off the road. It makes driving safer for everyone too. How many times did you almost hit the back of a car because it didn't have working brake lights? The MVIS test can minimize things like that from happening.

    But before you get your car inspected, what exactly do they need to check? A lot, as it turns out. Per LTO's Memorandum Circular No. 2020-2240, there are nearly 20 pages of things they will inspect. We've sifted it out for you so here's the rundown.

    Above carriage inspection

    The MVIS test is split in two, namely above carriage inspection and undercarriage inspection. Let's first take a closer look at the above carriage checks.

    It includes the body, the glass area, lights, and so on. This check also covers the interior, so make sure it's all tidy and in working order. For the body check, they will see if the vehicle has rust on the panels, and if everything is intact. Loose panels and duct-taped parts are a no-no. Also, your headlights shouldn't only be functional, these must be aligned and clear too. They'll also take a look at your turn signals, license plate lights, taillights, and reverse lights for good measure.

    But above carriage inspection goes beyond checking all the lights. The vehicle's windshields and windows must be spotless, so any cracks, deep scratches, or temporary repairs are an immediate fail. Your wipers must be functional and in good condition, along with the windshield washers. Tires are checked for tread depth and age, and regrooved tires are not allowed. The steering wheel shouldn't have unnecessary play and effort must be equal when turning left and right. The horn must have a consistent tone and volume when pressed for a long time.

    If that seems like a lot, we're not done yet. The interior is subject to checks as well. Your instrument cluster must be backlit and all dials should be accurate. The parking brake needs to be tight and be able to hold the car at an angle. At the same time, they will check if your brakes and clutch are up to scratch. Also, the rear-view and side-view mirrors should provide a clear view of the flanks and the back. Even the seats and seatbelts are inspected to see if it is safe for use.

    Other things for checking? MVIS inspectors will see to it that fumes do not enter the cabin, and the air-conditioning is filled with the proper refrigerant. As mentioned before, the exhaust system must not be louder than 99 dB. They'll even look at the floorboard if outside leaks are seeping into the cabin. The fuel tank and fuel delivery system will also get inspected for any signs of wear, damage, or bad repairs. Every switch and dial must be functional and the battery securely mounted.

    Undercarriage inspection

    Now that we've covered everything above the chassis, what do MVIS inspectors look out for under the car? They watch out for three key things, namely rust, suspension and mounting play, and leaks. They check leaks from the radiator, transmission, engine, power steering, hoses, pipes, brake lines, differentials, and dampers. Bushings, driveshafts, CV joints, linkages, steering, and engine mounts must be tight and free from play and vibrations.

    As for corrosion, there shouldn't be any in the hard points of the chassis and the floor pan. For pick-ups, traditional SUVs, AUVs, and vans (ex. Hilux, D-Max, Fortuner, mu-X), the inspectors take a closer look at the frame that serves as the backbone of the vehicle. They also check if there is damage, deformation, or cut and shut welds. Springs and handbrake cables are also checked, and the MVIS center makes sure that all nuts and bolts are properly installed in the car. For those who have spare tire mounts outside the vehicle, these must be secured properly and not at risk of falling off.

    Yes, it's a lot to take in, but it's all for the sake of safety. If any of the parts mentioned require immediate attention in your car, it's best to take it to the shop and do the repair and services needed before you schedule your MVIS center visit. You wouldn't want to go there only for your front license plate to be confiscated for failing the inspection.
    Sounds reasonable naman basta to the letter nila susundin hopefully maautomate karamihan ng mga tests para mabilis ung inspection (at iwas daya)

  10. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    38,863
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by LOLZ View Post
    Sounds reasonable naman basta to the letter nila susundin hopefully maautomate karamihan ng mga tests para mabilis ung inspection (at iwas daya)
    [vid=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptjS5mMOT4Qt=226]SHAKEN:How to take a car inspection in Japan(22) - YouTube[/vid]
    i suspect that, due to the seeming stricticity and comprehensivity of the testing,
    "under-the-table money will exchange hands".

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[AI] Here's what they'll check during MVIS inspection