New and Used Car Talk Reviews Hot Cars Comparison Automotive Community

The Largest Car Forum in the Philippines



Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    4,614
    #1
    went to megamall last night when it was raining hard, and there was a bit of drama on the carpark ramps... a Starex couldn't get up the wet ramp and was just vaporizing its rear tires to thick, expensive smoke. the security guards had to push it up the ramp.

    the Adventure behind it (which had to stop to give the starex room to roll back in case) and in front of me had a similarly hard time launching, the rear tires simply couldn't find any grip and the driver was flooring the pedal to no avail. it had to be pushed up as well.

    however, the Venture I was driving didn't have any problems going up the wet ramp from a standstill, and the Civic behind me didn't have a problem too

    bakit ganun? disadvantaged ba talaga yung RWD up wet inclines?

    what could you do to manage the wet incline if you were driving a RWD vehicle, in case you had to stop and couldn't get up? would applying the brakes (foot brake or park brake) while gently opening the throttle do the trick?
    Last edited by mbt; July 7th, 2003 at 07:04 PM.

  2. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    665
    #2
    baka kalbo na yung mga tires nila.

    taois sobra yung pag apak sa accelerator, dapat moderate lang or in case too much wheel spin on diesels sa 1st gear pwede 2nd gear.

    AFAIK mas llamado nga yung RWD sa paakyat kesa FWD.

  3. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,219
    #3
    yun din ang alam ko e, mas lamang dapat ang RWD sa upramp climbs dahil mas malakas ang tyre friction sa rear wheels vs. front wheels. baka tyre contact lang nagkatalo, mas malapad yata gulong ng venture vs. starex and adventure tapos mas mabigat pa. yung sa honda naman, baka mas bago gulong...

    traction lang nagkatalo yan and coefficient of friction. naalala ko tuloy yung physics lessons ko nung HS pa ko


  4. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    3,144
    #4
    Originally posted by mbt

    what could you do to manage the wet incline if you were driving a RWD vehicle, in case you had to stop and couldn't get up? would applying the brakes (foot brake or park brake) while gently opening the throttle do the trick?
    yes.

    timing sa release ng hand brake. Pero di ko pa nasubukan sa ford, kasi foot break yon and left hand release. Eh sanay na ako na left hand gamit ko sa wheel.

  5. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    400
    #5
    I saw a similar case going up the Shangri-La multilevel parking. A local diesel pickup couldn't get up, and it wasn't even raining. The guards sat in the bed until the truck could get a move on.

    This has nothing to do with RWD but rather with weight distribution. There prolly isn't enough weight at the rear for the tires to grip properly, pointing to an overly front-heavy vehicle design. Nothing unexpected though, those vehicles, starex, adventure, lcv pickup, etc. are designed to be able to load a lot of weight on their rear so when unladen the rear is really very light and the suspension too hard to get proper grip.

  6. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    400
    #6
    what could you do to manage the wet incline if you were driving a RWD vehicle, in case you had to stop and couldn't get up? would applying the brakes (foot brake or park brake) while gently opening the throttle do the trick?
    The technique is similar to the manual-diff lock trick. 4x4 magazine covered it, you basically move at a crawl and give light pressure on the brake pedal just heavy enough to keep a loose wheel from spinning but still light enough to not stall the engine. The end result is similar to pseudo-differential locking in newer SUVs (X5, MDX, etc.). In an issue last year, they demoed this using a Jimny going through a mogul. Opposing tires lifted and spun, then without locking any diffs they got it to move forward using the left-foot braking technique.

  7. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    29,320
    #7
    Originally posted by mbt
    went to megamall last night when it was raining hard, and there was a bit of drama on the carpark ramps... a Starex couldn't get up the wet ramp and was just vaporizing its rear tires to thick, expensive smoke. the security guards had to push it up the ramp.

    the Adventure behind it (which had to stop to give the starex room to roll back in case) and in front of me had a similarly hard time launching, the rear tires simply couldn't find any grip and the driver was flooring the pedal to no avail. it had to be pushed up as well.

    however, the Venture I was driving didn't have any problems going up the wet ramp from a standstill, and the Civic behind me didn't have a problem too

    bakit ganun? disadvantaged ba talaga yung RWD up wet inclines?

    what could you do to manage the wet incline if you were driving a RWD vehicle, in case you had to stop and couldn't get up? would applying the brakes (foot brake or park brake) while gently opening the throttle do the trick?
    The problem is a combination of two factors:

    1. weight distribution... the engine is in front & the van/pickup is RWD. The drive wheels don't have enough weight on top of it to give them a good grip.

    2. open differential... once one wheel starts to slip, all power from the engine goes to that wheel. If the vehicle was equipted with a limited slip differential (LSD), the entire incident wouldn't have happened.

  8. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,477
    #8
    baka sinubukan mag burnout hehe

  9. Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    65
    #9
    Actually, in that condition, even an lsd equipped vehicle will have a problem. Its mainly a traction problem. Lsd will help but only to an extent. Btw, pagkakaalam ko LSD ang starex diba.

    Tire brand makes a big difference in this aspect. Tire width doesn't matter. Its the tire compound. A soft compound tire would grip better. Hondas, being lighter would have softer compound tires (depends din on the brand) designed to grip the road for better handling. A load carrying vehicle, would have harder compound rubber to withstand the heavy loads and still provide acceptable tire wear. Of course at the expense of handling but then you won't corner an AUV at 120 kp/h.

    This is also the reason why many dedicated off road tires, like my swampers wear faster on pavement (aside from the tread design). Off road tires are made with soft compound rubber to grip rocks better and be soft enough to flex and wrap the tread around an obstacle. At the expense of load carrying capacity. The max. load rating on my tires are 2250 lbs. per tire, i think. Many SUV AT tires have a higher load rating.

  10. Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    4,085
    #10
    san ulit yan? megamall?

    masubukan nga..4x4 rulez..!!

    hmm..pero sa malamang tire traction ang naging problema nila..sa ganung sitwasyon lang naman hindi hahatak ang sasakyan eh.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
RWD can't get up a wet paved road from a standstill?