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  1. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    126
    #1
    I'm looking at getting a Makita 9227C (the one you reviewed in the PAD forum). Saw one, mura lang: P7,800.

    I'd like to know how to use one properly. When is the next EB, or when is your next detailing project where you will use your rotary?... Can I watch how you use and work it?

    Are there web sites that have some sort of instruction on its proper usage? I have several things that I can practice on:

    - the pick up bed of my Strada (it's covered with a camper shell naman.
    - a really old pick up, wherein if I actually burn the paint, it might look better.
    - a 1997 highlander that has never been waxed/detailed, and is used for "harabas" only, so I know no one will mind.
    - Our company trucks and other pick-ups...

    --Alf

  2. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    13,415
    #2
    Hi Alfa: I'm not discouraging you or anything ha, but a rotary isn't a tool that can really be taught by words or even by "show and tell"... I can teach you how to use it properly and safely, but how to use it effectively and successfully will depend on a lot of factors such as your skill, you eye (on seeing how far you're going), your product, your pad, the actual paint surface, etc etc etc...

    Since you have "test vehicles" to work on, that's a good head start for you. I'll give you several tips now assuming that you're a first time user talaga and minimize natin ang damage at hirap... note that these tips may not give you the best result but at least you have a clue...

    1) Start slow, with the 9227C, practice the control for the machine with speeds no more than 1.5 setting. Practice a lot on vertical surfaces coz they're a lot harder to polish then flat (control wise)

    2) If you have a "salvageable car" to work with, practice with a wool pad. A wool pad cuts quite rapidly on most clearcoat paint, but if you have an old car, mas ok sya coz at low speeds, the wool pad will not generate as much heat as any foam pad.

    3) Use more product than you do by hand. Otherwise, it'll skip and jump.

    4) Work on small areas only and move the buffer constantly.

    5) Keep the pad flat to minimize digging of the 2 o'clock quadrant of the buffer.

    6) DONT RUSH.

    Read this as well, ok rin sya...

    http://forums.mbworld.org/forums/showthread.php?s=c0b2969c09df9495ec42f83b5a321a07& amp;threadid=17340

    1. You recommend using an oil based polish that contains a good amount of clay. So would you recommend against using the 3M compounds since they seem use Al Oxide? Is there another line of polishes you would recommend that can be store bought?
    For some reason, quality products are not sold at local stores. Check with a vendor that mostly deals with profesionals, the good part is they come to you. I use Malco Pro because their products are not only good but inexpensive. I've used 3M products before in restorations for heaving wool pad buffing but I don't like their products for foam pad buffing. Besides, your first order is bound to be large as you'll need buffing pads, polishing compound and other stuff they have. Also the dealers that come to you can give you advise and help you get started.

    2. Do you keep the speed at 1,500 at all times? Can one go lower...like around 1,000?
    Most polishing machines don't go lower than 1,500. The problem with going too slow is that you won't generate the heat you need to remove swirls. Experiment with different speeds but start slow and work your way up. Sometimes I go for 2,000 rpm if I'm in a rush and the car is badly oxidized. You can tell when it's too hot because the metal will be hot to the touch, it should be warm, not hot. Also a 6" pad is very forgiving, don't worry about the speed

    3. Can the second polishing step (to remove marring from the first compounding step) be done with the PC, or is the Rotary still the best tool for even the polishing/finishing step?
    I only have the space and budget to work with one tool. The PC is good for applying and removing wax but I usually do that by hand.

    4. When working an area (assuming one applies the correct amount of compound) how long till the pad consumes the product and the area is done?
    I use about a quarter size blob of polish and cover an area about 1/4 size of the hood and go back and forth 2-3 times in each direction and the polish is gone, maybe 30 seconds. It does start to build up in the pad after a while so use less as you go. Remember, too much polish makes for more work

    5. In addition to sharp edges, I hear all edges of panels are thin and prone to getting cut through. Should I cut near the edges first when doing a panel?
    Some detailers use masking tape so they don't accidently hit those areas, I just learned to not do them, hit them by hand if they need it

    6. Would you recommend taping the trim before starting?
    Beginners should tape sharp creases and trim until they learn to avoid them, trim/emblems chews up $15 pads, not cost effective

    7. On really contoured areas of the car, it's impossible to keep the pad flat. How do you cut those areas?
    That's one reason I use a 6" pad that has rounded edges, I can get into some steep curves without a problem like the hood on my daughters '98 Mustang.

    It's not that hard to do, common sense is all it takes. I've showed people from 16 year olds with their first car to school teachers and nobody has damaged their car and everyone was impressed.

  3. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    2,277
    #3
    theveed, how about yung buffing machine na meron vertical motion? Ok ba itong gamitin pag nagwawax ako using Maguire Gold wax? I was able to buy one in HK and it is made in England. It rotates and it also move vertically up and down simulating yung normal hand stroke.


  4. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    13,415
    #4
    I don't understand what you mean by vertical motion... I think you mean an orbital... Gold class is so easy to apply, makes no sense using a machine to apply it coz it'll just use up so much more product.

    Like you said, it mimiks hand motion so it's pretty much a fool proof alternative to hand application.

  5. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    2,277
    #5
    Yes, I think you call it orbital motion, it rotate and move. I manually apply the wax and use this to buff the wax para mas maganda ang pagka polish. Tama ba ito? I'm thinking baka lalong masira yung paint pag gumagamit ako nitong buffing machine.




  6. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    13,415
    #6
    Nah, that's fine... an orbital is nothing more than a fast, large, untiring hand...

  7. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    126
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by theveed
    Nah, that's fine... an orbital is nothing more than a fast, large, untiring hand...
    I was going to say something green... but never mind... people here at tsikot have good enough imaginations....

    --Alf

  8. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    13,415
    #8
    Just make sure your pads/bonnets are clean and you'll do no more harm than your hand could... (just be careful on the cords hitting the side of the paint, the edges of the buffer, etc etc.. common sense stuff.)

Attn: theveed. Re: Rotary Buffer