New and Used Car Talk Reviews Hot Cars Comparison Automotive Community

The Largest Car Forum in the Philippines



View Poll Results: Which do you prefer? Buried or Cremated ???

Voters
60. You may not vote on this poll
  • Buried in the ground

    14 23.33%
  • Cremated (burned)

    37 61.67%
  • Either one is okay for me

    6 10.00%
  • Neither one, let others decide na lang

    3 5.00%
Page 15 of 16 FirstFirst ... 5111213141516 LastLast
Results 141 to 150 of 158
  1. Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    5,915
    #141
    Vatican Clarifies the Rules for Cremation: Bury, Don’t Scatter - The New York Times




    Vatican Clarifies the Rules for Cremation: Bury, Don’t Scatter
    By Elisabetta Povoledo and Gaia Pianigiani
    Oct. 25, 2016

    VATICAN CITY — Ashes to ashes is fine, the Vatican says, as long as you don’t spread them around.

    On Tuesday, the Vatican responded to what it called an “unstoppable increase” in cremation and issued guidelines barring the scattering of ashes “in the air, on land, at sea or in some other way.”

    The Vatican decreed that the ashes of loved ones have no place in the home, and certainly not in jewelry. It urged that cremated remains be preserved in cemeteries or other approved sacred places.

    The instructions, which reiterate the Roman Catholic Church’s preference for burial over cremation, are in line with previous teachings. But local bishops’ conferences had requested doctrinal clarification because cremation has become increasingly popular and because there were “no specific canonical norms” for preserving ashes, according to Cardinal Gerhard Ludwig Müller, the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, which drafted the guidelines.

    The new guidelines, which Pope Francis approved this year, were released ahead of All Souls Day, which falls on Nov. 2 for Catholics, who are called to remember and pray for those who have died.

    The church banned cremation for centuries, but began to allow the practice in 1963, as long as it is not done for reasons at odds with Christian doctrine. Burials are deeply embedded in Christian tradition, and in the United States and elsewhere many dioceses still run graveyards and cemeteries, though cremation and other alternatives are on the rise.

    “We are facing a new challenge for the evangelization of death,” Cardinal Müller said at a news conference on Tuesday, discussing the centrality of death and resurrection for Christians. He emphasized the church’s “doctrinal and pastoral reasons” for burial, which it “continues to insistently recommend.”

    Cardinal Müller added: “We believe in the resurrection of the body, so burial is the normal form for the Christian faithful, especially Catholics, whom we are addressing with this document.”

    In that spirit, the document explains, the church cannot “condone attitudes or permit rites that involve erroneous ideas about death, such as considering death as the definitive annihilation of the person, or the moment of fusion with Mother Nature or the universe, or as a stage in the cycle of regeneration, or as the definitive liberation from the ‘prison’ of the body.”

    Beyond respect for the deceased, the document notes that burial in a cemetery “encourages family members and the whole Christian community to pray for and remember the dead, while at the same time fostering the veneration of martyrs and saints.”

    Burial prevents the forgetting of the loved one, as well as “unfitting or superstitious practices,” the document states.

    For that reason, the Vatican said that cremation urns should not be kept at home, save for “grave and exceptional cases dependent on cultural conditions of a localized nature.”

    But as Cardinal Müller acknowledged, the increasing use of cremations seems inexorable, and parish priests have been struggling with issues like the handling of ashes on a regular basis.

    “I tell my parishioners that it’s not opportune to do so,” said the Rev. Roberto Salsa, a parish priest in the Piedmont town of Verbania in Italy, when asked about the practice of scattering ashes.

    A deceased loved one, said Father Salsa, should be in a place “accessible to everyone, where they can be venerated,” so a cemetery is preferable to a home. And scattering ashes can be “misunderstood as a sort of religion of nature, while we believe in resurrection,” he said.

    Laws on cremation and the preservation of ashes vary. In Italy, it is legal to spread ashes, according to the will of the deceased, with authorization and in areas that local authorities have approved for the purpose.

    Cremation has become increasingly popular in Italy, where 21 percent of the deceased in 2015 had opted for it. Rules vary by region and sometimes from town to town. Survivors may be allowed to bury urns inside cemeteries, keep them at home or scatter the ashes at sea or in private areas.

    Other European countries are also rather liberal with the preservation of ashes. In France, relatives are allowed to spread ashes, but not keep them at home. In Switzerland, human ashes can be transformed into diamonds, as in some parts of the United States. State laws regarding the disposition of ashes vary; many allow the scattering of ashes in parks or at sea, with various restrictions.

    The Vatican document encourages the faithful to recall the significance of death and resurrection within the Christian tradition.

    “The cadaver of a deceased person is not the private property of the family, but the deceased is the son of God, part of the body of Christ, of the people of God,” Cardinal Müller said. He added that public funerals expressed the spirit of communion.

    “We have to overcome the thought of being too individualistic,” he said, calling the family unit “part of the great family of Christ.”



    Joshua Slocum, the executive director of the Funeral Consumers Alliance, a nonprofit group in South Burlington, Vt., that combats exploitative practices in the funeral industry, said cremations in the United States began steadily rising in the early 1960s. By some estimates, he said, they may have surpassed traditional burials. “The traditional idea of everyone in a family being buried in one cemetery plot in a hometown really belongs to a different era,” he said.

    The trend is likely to continue, he said, given that more Americans are opting not to affiliate with organized religions. “Of those who choose cremation,” he said, “I think we’ll see more people choosing to keep ashes at home or scattering them rather than placing them in cemeteries.”

    Follow Elisabetta Povoledo *EPovoledo and Gaia Pianigiani *gaia_pianigiani on Twitter.

    Elisabetta Povoledo reported from Vatican City, and Gaia Pianigiani from Rome. Sewell Chan contributed reporting from London.
    A version of this article appears in print on October 26, 2016, on Page A4 of the New York edition with the headline: Vatican Clarifies Cremation Rules: Bury,




    Sent from my SM-T705 using Tapatalk

  2. Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    9,581
    #142
    Quote Originally Posted by _Cathy_ View Post
    Roman Catholic church doesn't allow it.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk
    we have no issues with that..we are not catholics

    Sent from my SM-G955F using Tsikot Forums mobile app

  3. Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    45,784
    #143
    Quote Originally Posted by falken View Post
    Vatican Clarifies the Rules for Cremation: Bury, Don’t Scatter - The New York Times




    Vatican Clarifies the Rules for Cremation: Bury, Don’t Scatter
    By Elisabetta Povoledo and Gaia Pianigiani
    Oct. 25, 2016

    VATICAN CITY — Ashes to ashes is fine, the Vatican says, as long as you don’t spread them around.

    On Tuesday, the Vatican responded to what it called an “unstoppable increase” in cremation and issued guidelines barring the scattering of ashes “in the air, on land, at sea or in some other way.”

    The Vatican decreed that the ashes of loved ones have no place in the home, and certainly not in jewelry. It urged that cremated remains be preserved in cemeteries or other approved sacred places.

    The instructions, which reiterate the Roman Catholic Church’s preference for burial over cremation, are in line with previous teachings. But local bishops’ conferences had requested doctrinal clarification because cremation has become increasingly popular and because there were “no specific canonical norms” for preserving ashes, according to Cardinal Gerhard Ludwig Müller, the prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, which drafted the guidelines.

    The new guidelines, which Pope Francis approved this year, were released ahead of All Souls Day, which falls on Nov. 2 for Catholics, who are called to remember and pray for those who have died.

    The church banned cremation for centuries, but began to allow the practice in 1963, as long as it is not done for reasons at odds with Christian doctrine. Burials are deeply embedded in Christian tradition, and in the United States and elsewhere many dioceses still run graveyards and cemeteries, though cremation and other alternatives are on the rise.

    “We are facing a new challenge for the evangelization of death,” Cardinal Müller said at a news conference on Tuesday, discussing the centrality of death and resurrection for Christians. He emphasized the church’s “doctrinal and pastoral reasons” for burial, which it “continues to insistently recommend.”

    Cardinal Müller added: “We believe in the resurrection of the body, so burial is the normal form for the Christian faithful, especially Catholics, whom we are addressing with this document.”

    In that spirit, the document explains, the church cannot “condone attitudes or permit rites that involve erroneous ideas about death, such as considering death as the definitive annihilation of the person, or the moment of fusion with Mother Nature or the universe, or as a stage in the cycle of regeneration, or as the definitive liberation from the ‘prison’ of the body.”

    Beyond respect for the deceased, the document notes that burial in a cemetery “encourages family members and the whole Christian community to pray for and remember the dead, while at the same time fostering the veneration of martyrs and saints.”

    Burial prevents the forgetting of the loved one, as well as “unfitting or superstitious practices,” the document states.

    For that reason, the Vatican said that cremation urns should not be kept at home, save for “grave and exceptional cases dependent on cultural conditions of a localized nature.”

    But as Cardinal Müller acknowledged, the increasing use of cremations seems inexorable, and parish priests have been struggling with issues like the handling of ashes on a regular basis.

    “I tell my parishioners that it’s not opportune to do so,” said the Rev. Roberto Salsa, a parish priest in the Piedmont town of Verbania in Italy, when asked about the practice of scattering ashes.

    A deceased loved one, said Father Salsa, should be in a place “accessible to everyone, where they can be venerated,” so a cemetery is preferable to a home. And scattering ashes can be “misunderstood as a sort of religion of nature, while we believe in resurrection,” he said.

    Laws on cremation and the preservation of ashes vary. In Italy, it is legal to spread ashes, according to the will of the deceased, with authorization and in areas that local authorities have approved for the purpose.

    Cremation has become increasingly popular in Italy, where 21 percent of the deceased in 2015 had opted for it. Rules vary by region and sometimes from town to town. Survivors may be allowed to bury urns inside cemeteries, keep them at home or scatter the ashes at sea or in private areas.

    Other European countries are also rather liberal with the preservation of ashes. In France, relatives are allowed to spread ashes, but not keep them at home. In Switzerland, human ashes can be transformed into diamonds, as in some parts of the United States. State laws regarding the disposition of ashes vary; many allow the scattering of ashes in parks or at sea, with various restrictions.

    The Vatican document encourages the faithful to recall the significance of death and resurrection within the Christian tradition.

    “The cadaver of a deceased person is not the private property of the family, but the deceased is the son of God, part of the body of Christ, of the people of God,” Cardinal Müller said. He added that public funerals expressed the spirit of communion.

    “We have to overcome the thought of being too individualistic,” he said, calling the family unit “part of the great family of Christ.”



    Joshua Slocum, the executive director of the Funeral Consumers Alliance, a nonprofit group in South Burlington, Vt., that combats exploitative practices in the funeral industry, said cremations in the United States began steadily rising in the early 1960s. By some estimates, he said, they may have surpassed traditional burials. “The traditional idea of everyone in a family being buried in one cemetery plot in a hometown really belongs to a different era,” he said.

    The trend is likely to continue, he said, given that more Americans are opting not to affiliate with organized religions. “Of those who choose cremation,” he said, “I think we’ll see more people choosing to keep ashes at home or scattering them rather than placing them in cemeteries.”

    Follow Elisabetta Povoledo *EPovoledo and Gaia Pianigiani *gaia_pianigiani on Twitter.

    Elisabetta Povoledo reported from Vatican City, and Gaia Pianigiani from Rome. Sewell Chan contributed reporting from London.
    A version of this article appears in print on October 26, 2016, on Page A4 of the New York edition with the headline: Vatican Clarifies Cremation Rules: Bury,




    Sent from my SM-T705 using Tapatalk
    Great Article.

    We respect those who choose cremation but since my family is traditional Roman Catholic, burial pa rin.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by _Cathy_; February 18th, 2018 at 05:54 PM.

  4. Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,009
    #144

  5. Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,702
    #145
    your body isn't who you are, it's just a host for your mind where the important stuff happens

    but of course you have to keep it healthy otherwise you die

    and btw your cells die all the time and new cells replace it. after some time you're not even the same body anymore

    when you die the neural net in your brain collapses and the vast majority of the data is lost forever unless there's some future technology that'll be able to download it. so forget about being resurrected

  6. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37,196
    #146
    Quote Originally Posted by Vodka View Post
    your body isn't who you are, it's just a host for your mind where the important stuff happens

    but of course you have to keep it healthy otherwise you die

    and btw your cells die all the time and new cells replace it. after some time you're not even the same body anymore

    when you die the neural net in your brain collapses and the vast majority of the data is lost forever unless there's some future technology that'll be able to download it. so forget about being resurrected
    klingons. after death, the body is but an empty shell. discard like garbage, they don't care.

    the vulcan katra!
    depository in mt seleya.
    Last edited by dr. d; February 20th, 2018 at 12:45 AM.

  7. Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    300
    #147
    Cremation. Have bought columbary spaces for my loved ones already.

  8. Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,851
    #148
    Chinese man buried in his car as dying wish is granted | South China Morning Post
    Louise Moon
    31 May, 2018

    A villager was buried in his car instead of a coffin in northern China on Monday, as requested in his will, according to reports.

    The car-loving man from Baoding city in Hebei province, surnamed Qi according to website Kankan News, had asked to be buried inside his silver Hyundai Sonata when he died, reported news site Sohu on Wednesday.

    Hyundai Sonata? I prefer to be buried in a coffin car.



    BTW, that's the Dragula from the tv show The Munsters.


  9. Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,702
    #149
    burial or cremation. so old school

    what if in our lifetime we develop a technology to preserve our bodies, including the contents of our brains, in "cold storage" until such time that we develop a technology to cure ageing or tech to download our brains into a simulation e.g. The Matrix

    which means that someday you'd wake up in the future w/ all your memories intact

    unfortunately this "cold storage" thing is gonna be very expensive

  10. Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    5,246
    #150
    ^
    Idiocracy movie comes to mind.

    Sent from my BLL-L22 using Tapatalk

Which do you prefer? Buried or Cremated ???