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  1. Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    1,005
    #1
    Check out the battery he's showing off at the timestamp. Hanep! 3lbs for 660CCA, and has internal protection that shuts itself off if charge ever goes below a certain level so your car always has enough juice to start.



    Is there any store importing lithium-ion car batteries locally? I know this stuff is hard to bring in because of cargo handling restrictions.

    Edit: If the timestamp doesn't work, lithium battery talk is at 23 minutes. Or just watch the whole thing. It's very entertaining.

  2. Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    3,639
    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kamiya View Post
    Check out the battery he's showing off at the timestamp. Hanep! 3lbs for 660CCA, and has internal protection that shuts itself off if charge ever goes below a certain level so your car always has enough juice to start.



    Is there any store importing lithium-ion car batteries locally? I know this stuff is hard to bring in because of cargo handling restrictions.

    Edit: If the timestamp doesn't work, lithium battery talk is at 23 minutes. Or just watch the whole thing. It's very entertaining.
    I think that battery can be made DIY if you have proper tools and electronics.. its like an e-bike battery in 12V configuration with internal balance charger and low voltage protection..just need to have quality li-ion cells in a fire retardant casing

  3. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    2,638
    #3
    Almost 1,000$ USD daw yan.

    Almost ten times the price of a lead-acid counterpart.

    Id rather pay the amount than to DIY building my own battery.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    4,873
    #4
    ...has internal protection that shuts itself off if charge ever goes below a certain level so your car always has enough juice to start.
    Just to point out that THAT is not the purpose of the battery's internal protection.

    LiIon batteries must be protected from going below a certain voltage. Typically, they operate between ~3.0V to ~4.2V per cell. In other words, 3.0V (2.8V in some cells) is already considered 0% state-of-charge (SOC). Over-discharging beyond 2.8/3.0V will drastically reduce the lifespan of the battery and letting it go down to near or at 0V will permanently damage the cell. Hence, the need for a protection circuit is for the safety of the battery.... not to leave "enough juice to start" the engine.

  5. Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    12,859
    #5
    I was watching that vid last night too. Lithium-ion Batteries?


    His battery intrigued me also, especially its brand name : antigravity. Lithium-ion Batteries?


    He gave up his subaru forester for that tight ek unit. Not a bad deal naman

    the things you own end up owning you
    Last edited by baludoy; May 10th, 2020 at 12:12 PM.

  6. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    37,205
    #6
    according to google, the lifespan is about the same as the ordinary lead acid battery.
    i figure, for the average motorista, it is not significantly cost-effective for whatever advantages it offers.

    what about those small lithium-battery-car-starters-for-emergencies, instead?
    Last edited by dr. d; May 10th, 2020 at 01:01 PM.

  7. Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    2,972
    #7
    Been following their youtube channel when they first got that ek hatchback and evo 9. Swerte din kasi sponsored mostly mga parts na ginamit nila.

    That antigravity battery that he used retails around 310usd

  8. Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    1,005
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by oj88 View Post
    Just to point out that THAT is not the purpose of the battery's internal protection.

    LiIon batteries must be protected from going below a certain voltage. Typically, they operate between ~3.0V to ~4.2V per cell. In other words, 3.0V (2.8V in some cells) is already considered 0% state-of-charge (SOC). Over-discharging beyond 2.8/3.0V will drastically reduce the lifespan of the battery and letting it go down to near or at 0V will permanently damage the cell. Hence, the need for a protection circuit is for the safety of the battery.... not to leave "enough juice to start" the engine.
    Took the time to read up on Antigravity's website. Turns out it's a bit of both:

    What protections are built into your re-start batteries?

    1. They prevent the vehicle from draining the Re-Start battery below 12 volts over time. This is good for preventing “parasitic drain” issues.
    2. They prevent the vehicle from draining the battery below 8 volts during cranking. This prevents it from being used in an application too large for what is intended.
    3. They protect against occasional spikes in voltage beyond 14.8. This does NOT include when a regulator has failed and allows system volts to constantly rise above 14.8.
    So they have their protection circuit set to cut off at 12V which is rather high, but the objective is so that the battery doesn't dip below 8V when cranking. You could say if the objective was only to prevent over discharge then it could have been set at 8V which I assume is when the internal cells will be at their lower bound of 3.0V, the tradeoff being the battery protection circuit will likely engage while trying to crank.

    IMO they purposely set their protection circuit voltage higher so there is always enough juice left to crank, as the guy presenting the build video also claimed.

  9. Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    3,639
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kamiya View Post
    Took the time to read up on Antigravity's website. Turns out it's a bit of both:



    So they have their protection circuit set to cut off at 12V which is rather high, but the objective is so that the battery doesn't dip below 8V when cranking. You could say if the objective was only to prevent over discharge then it could have been set at 8V which I assume is when the internal cells will be at their lower bound of 3.0V, the tradeoff being the battery protection circuit will likely engage while trying to crank.

    IMO they purposely set their protection circuit voltage higher so there is always enough juice left to crank, as the guy presenting the build video also claimed.
    No sir..as said.by oj88...lithium ion batteries cannot go below 3.0V per cell.. ideal charge of lithium ion batts is 3.7 - 4.2 V per cell.. maybe its a 14.8V 4S li-ion setup that is electronically controlled. In lead acid batts cranking volts of 8V is already too low..

  10. Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    4,873
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Kamiya View Post
    Took the time to read up on Antigravity's website
    IMO they purposely set their protection circuit voltage higher so there is always enough juice left to crank, as the guy presenting the build video also claimed.
    Nope. Again, the protection circuit is for the battery... not the load.

    If the battery voltage goes below a certain threshold, the protection circuit cuts off current flow from the battery to prevent further discharge. So if it's open-circuit, there'll be be zero volts out of the battery. Needless to say, no power, no cranking.

    There's typically a bypass diode that allows the cells to be recharged. Once the cell voltage goes above a safe threshold, the protection circuit will disengage to allow the battery to again supply power to the load.

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