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  1. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    29,320
    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by uls View Post
    from the article:


    ya it's not absurd to convert PUJs to LPG

    but who will finance the conversion?

    mga PUJ operators?

    anyone seriously think PUJ operators will come up with the money?

    sige govt will lend money to PUJ operators... pwede...

    one more thing -- govt financing the conversion to LPG means the govt isnt likely to phase out PUJs soon. so tuloy parin ang outdated inefficient public transport system na yan
    Years ago, at the height of the Auto-LPG convertion adaption, the government (under PGMA) released a few million pesos to convert jeepneys to Auto-LPG. Unfortunately, over 60% went straight into the pockets of the government officials, leaving very little to fund the actual jeepney conversion project.

  2. Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,405
    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by ghosthunter View Post
    Years ago, at the height of the Auto-LPG convertion adaption, the government (under PGMA) released a few million pesos to convert jeepneys to Auto-LPG. Unfortunately, over 60% went straight into the pockets of the government officials, leaving very little to fund the actual jeepney conversion project.
    hehe

    govt should try again

    supposedly wala corruption ang PNoy admin right?

  3. Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    6,236
    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by uls View Post
    ya operators won't even replace worn out tires

    smoke belching, di gumagana ang headlights, pero may sound system

    government can create a program where the PUJ operators don't actually get cash for the conversion but operators bring their jeeps to a conversion facility then the operators sign papers and stuff and the govt will singil them monthly installment. the govt pays the conversion facility (great racket for the conversion facility owner. sigurado well-connected ang may-ari hehe)
    Headlights AND taillights. I once rear ended a jeepney because he stopped abruptly to let down passengers. Thank God the passenger hadn't started to dismount yet. Disaster happened due to rainy weather and the fact that his taillights either weren't working or haven't been switched on. I noticed that all jeepneys seem to have working taillights at night but close to none have working taillights in the daytime.

  4. Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,405
    #34
    Quote Originally Posted by GTi View Post
    Headlights AND taillights. I once rear ended a jeepney because he stopped abruptly to let down passengers. Thank God the passenger hadn't started to dismount yet. Disaster happened due to rainy weather and the fact that his taillights either weren't working or haven't been switched on. I noticed that all jeepneys seem to have working taillights at night but close to none have working taillights in the daytime.
    ya sa gabi dami PUJ walang ilaw. tapos gagastos sa LPG conversion? NOT LIKELY

  5. #35
    I'm currently living in a country where LPG as an automotive fuel is officially forbidden (Brazil), altough some outlaw conversions are still performed mainly in the countryside. However, CNG (a.k.a. methane gas or "biomethane") is widely used in taxis since Diesel fuel usage is limited to some vehicle classes due to either payload or traction systems. I have ridden some outlaw LPG-powered cars that used home LPG bottles but hadn't any problem with LPG leaks inside the cab, altough it's also blended with a sulphur compound to get smelly and ease the detection of a leak. As long as safety goes, it depends more on how the setup was installed than any other factor, and some commercial operators usually get the cheaper setups (often not the most suitables to the kind of vehicle) and cheaper services (not everytime so well performed)...

  6. Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    575
    #36
    Gentlemen:

    Truth be told, using jeepney's as public transportation was a stop-gap improvisation made possible the the abundant supply of ex-US Army Jeeps leftover from the 2nd World War and a lack of other alternatives.

    Now that better more economical, more environmentally-clean alternatives are available, there is really no good reason to keep them in operation.

    There is no way that they can easily be made safe and clean nor economical - there are too many constraints - we should look for better alternatives.

    We should lobby to phase out the jeepney's and their reckless drivers, its time for better public transport, NO OTHER COUNTRY in the world uses them.

    As to the problems with LPG smell, health, etc., well LPG like most industrial gases is mixed with an ODORANT - a very small amount of a different gas with a powerful smell that tells the user that there is a LEAK - it is a standard procedure when handling industrial gases - as LPG itself has NO SMELL.

    Usually the gas used is the cheapest available at the refinery - that usually means no one want's it - usually because it's toxic and corrosive (think sulfur dioxide, ethanthiol etc).

    Prolonged exposure to such a gas will produce the adverse health risks that are widely reported, what is important to remember is that this is not due to any problem with LPG per se, but a result of LEAKS in the system.

    So badly installed LPG systems will leak into the vehicle and slowly make you sick... same for any poorly made system.

    Best Regards,

    Dusky Lim

  7. Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,405
    #37
    who's gonna bring up the subject of phasing out of PUJs?

    which politician? who's brave enough? it's political suicide. it's too anti-poor

  8. Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    29,320
    #38
    *Dusky

    The issue with jeepneys is obvious. Its inefficient, old and unsafe. Best to have it replaced with safer and more efficient replacements, might those replacements be ejeepneys, mini-buses, etc. it doesn't matter.

    But to the masses, it's a matter of earning a living at a level they can sustain. To most of the jeepney drivers and operators, buying a new vehicle is out of the question. So the only ones who can do it would be the "rich" companies. So to the "poor", this will become a pro-rich movement. Hence the subject is too hot for any politician to tackle if they want to have a long political future.

    The only way to get jeepneys off the road will be an eventual process where there would be some unnoticed government move to make it prohibitive to register, purchase, maintain jeepneys as a whole.

  9. Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    38,405
    #39
    ya there are clean alternatives available

    look at the electric jeepney. the goal was to replace PUJs. how'd that go?

    how about those brand new million peso Isuzu elf mini buses that were supposed to replace PUJs? how'd that go? meron ba jeepney operator nag loan sa bangko para bumili ng elf bus?

    people who think they can sell PUJ operators electric jeepneys and million peso minibuses aren't in touch with reality

  10. Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    22,346
    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by cripple_rooster View Post
    The Chevy Volt is actually not a pure-electric vehicle, it still has a gasoline-powered generator.

    About replacements for the jeepneys, either a Nissan Urvan, Toyota Hiace or its Chinese copies would be suitable. There are even some versions of the Urvan fitted with jeepney-like bench seats...
    hmmm, Nissan or Toyota should start selling non-aircon units of these vans instead. Even the L300 FB w/out aircon could do (but with a crdi non-turbo unit instead).

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